How to check for an active Internet connection on iOS or OSX?


I would like to check to see if I have an Internet connection on iOS using the Cocoa Touch libraries or on OSX using the Cocoa libraries.

I came up with a way to do this using an NSURL. The way I did it seems a bit unreliable (because even Google could one day be down and relying on a third party seems bad), and while I could check to see for a response from some other websites if Google didn't respond, it does seem wasteful and an unnecessary overhead on my application.

- (BOOL) connectedToInternet
{
    NSString *URLString = [NSString stringWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.google.com"]];
    return ( URLString != NULL ) ? YES : NO;
}

Is what I have done bad? (Not to mention stringWithContentsOfURL is deprecated in iOS 3.0 and OSX 10.4) and if so, what is a better way to accomplish this?


Answers


METHOD 1: Use a simple (ARC and GCD compatible) class to do it

1) Add SystemConfiguration framework to the project but don't worry about including it anywhere

2) Add Tony Million's version of Reachability.h and Reachability.m to the project (found here: https://github.com/tonymillion/Reachability)

3) Update the interface section

#import "Reachability.h"

// Add this to the interface in the .m file of your view controller
@interface MyViewController ()
{
    Reachability *internetReachableFoo;
}
@end

4) Then implement this method in the .m file of your view controller which you can call

// Checks if we have an internet connection or not
- (void)testInternetConnection
{   
    internetReachableFoo = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostname:@"www.google.com"];

    // Internet is reachable
    internetReachableFoo.reachableBlock = ^(Reachability*reach)
    {
        // Update the UI on the main thread
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
            NSLog(@"Yayyy, we have the interwebs!");
        });
    };

    // Internet is not reachable
    internetReachableFoo.unreachableBlock = ^(Reachability*reach)
    {
        // Update the UI on the main thread
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
            NSLog(@"Someone broke the internet :(");
        });
    };

    [internetReachableFoo startNotifier];
}

METHOD 2: Do it yourself the old way using Apple's outdated Reachability class

1) Add SystemConfiguration framework to the project but don't worry about including it anywhere

2) Add Apple's version of Reachability.h and Reachability.m to the project (you can get those here)

3) Add @class Reachability; to the .h file of where you are implementing the code

4) Create a couple instances to check in the interface section of the .h file:

Reachability* internetReachable;
Reachability* hostReachable;

5) Add a method in the .h for when the network status updates:

-(void) checkNetworkStatus:(NSNotification *)notice;

6) Add #import "Reachability.h" to the .m file where you are implementing the check

7) In the .m file of where you are implementing the check, you can place this in one of the first methods called (init or viewWillAppear or viewDidLoad etc):

-(void) viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    // check for internet connection
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(checkNetworkStatus:) name:kReachabilityChangedNotification object:nil];

    internetReachable = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    [internetReachable startNotifier];

    // check if a pathway to a random host exists
    hostReachable = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostName:@"www.apple.com"];
    [hostReachable startNotifier];

    // now patiently wait for the notification
}

8) Set up the method for when the notification gets sent and set whatever checks or call whatever methods you may have set up (in my case, I just set a BOOL)

-(void) checkNetworkStatus:(NSNotification *)notice
{
    // called after network status changes
    NetworkStatus internetStatus = [internetReachable currentReachabilityStatus];
    switch (internetStatus)
    {
        case NotReachable:
        {
            NSLog(@"The internet is down.");
            self.internetActive = NO;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWiFi:
        {
            NSLog(@"The internet is working via WIFI.");
            self.internetActive = YES;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWWAN:
        {
            NSLog(@"The internet is working via WWAN.");
            self.internetActive = YES;

            break;
        }
    }

    NetworkStatus hostStatus = [hostReachable currentReachabilityStatus];
    switch (hostStatus)
    {
        case NotReachable:
        {
            NSLog(@"A gateway to the host server is down.");
            self.hostActive = NO;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWiFi:
        {
            NSLog(@"A gateway to the host server is working via WIFI.");
            self.hostActive = YES;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWWAN:
        {
            NSLog(@"A gateway to the host server is working via WWAN.");
            self.hostActive = YES;

            break;
        }
    }
}

9) In your dealloc or viewWillDisappear or similar method, remove yourself as an observer

-(void) viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self];
}

Note: There might be an instance using viewWillDisappear where you receive a memory warning and the observer never gets unregistered so you should account for that as well.


Note: The domain you use doesn't matter. It's just testing for a gateway to any domain.

Important Note: The Reachability class is one of the most used classes in projects so you might run into naming conflicts with other projects like ShareKit. If this happens, you'll have to rename one of the pairs of Reachability.h and Reachability.m files to something else to resolve the issue.




I like to keep things simple. The way I do this is:

//Class.h
#import "Reachability.h"
#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>

- (BOOL)connected;

//Class.m
- (BOOL)connected
{
    Reachability *reachability = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    NetworkStatus networkStatus = [reachability currentReachabilityStatus];
    return networkStatus != NotReachable;
}

Then, I use this whenever I want to see if I have a connection:

if (![self connected]) {
    // Not connected
} else {
    // Connected. Do some Internet stuff
}

This method doesn't wait for changed network statuses in order to do stuff. It just tests the status when you ask it to.




Using Apple's Reachability code, I created a function that'll check this correctly without you having to include any classes.

Include the SystemConfiguration.framework in your project.

Make some imports:

#import <sys/socket.h>
#import <netinet/in.h>
#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>

Now just call this function:

/*
Connectivity testing code pulled from Apple's Reachability Example: https://developer.apple.com/library/content/samplecode/Reachability
 */
+(BOOL)hasConnectivity {
    struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
    bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
    zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
    zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;

    SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(kCFAllocatorDefault, (const struct sockaddr*)&zeroAddress);
    if (reachability != NULL) {
        //NetworkStatus retVal = NotReachable;
        SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
        if (SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags)) {
            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsReachable) == 0)
            {
                // If target host is not reachable
                return NO;
            }

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionRequired) == 0)
            {
                // If target host is reachable and no connection is required
                //  then we'll assume (for now) that your on Wi-Fi
                return YES;
            }


            if ((((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnDemand ) != 0) ||
                 (flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnTraffic) != 0))
            {
                // ... and the connection is on-demand (or on-traffic) if the
                //     calling application is using the CFSocketStream or higher APIs.

                if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsInterventionRequired) == 0)
                {
                    // ... and no [user] intervention is needed
                    return YES;
                }
            }

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN) == kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN)
            {
                // ... but WWAN connections are OK if the calling application
                //     is using the CFNetwork (CFSocketStream?) APIs.
                return YES;
            }
        }
    }

    return NO;
}

And it's iOS 5 tested for you.




Check for Internet connection using the iOS SDK

Best way is to use Reachability code. Check here for apple sample code. That has a lot of convenience methods to check internet availability, Wifi/WAN connectivity check etc..

For eg:-

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(networkChanged:) name:kReachabilityChangedNotification object:nil];

reachability = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
[reachability startNotifier];

- (void)networkChanged:(NSNotification *)notification
{

  NetworkStatus remoteHostStatus = [reachability currentReachabilityStatus];

  if(remoteHostStatus == NotReachable) { NSLog(@"not reachable");}
  else if (remoteHostStatus == ReachableViaWiFiNetwork) { NSLog(@"wifi"); }
  else if (remoteHostStatus == ReachableViaCarrierDataNetwork) { NSLog(@"carrier"); }
}



Reachability has a lot more to it than it needs, plus it hasn't been updated for ARC yet.

Here's my solution in pure C. Much of the code was taken directly from Reachability, but distilled down to only what is necessary. I only wanted it to return whether there was or wasn't an internet connection, but you can read from the comments whether it's returning YES based on having found a Wifi or a Cellular network.

One last note before proceeding to share the code: You need to go into your build target, select the build phases tab, and add "SystemConfiguration.framework" to the "Link Binary With Libraries" list.

#import <CoreFoundation/CoreFoundation.h>
#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>
#import <netdb.h>

BOOL networkReachable()
{
    struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
    bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
    zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
    zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;

    SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachabilityRef = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(kCFAllocatorDefault, (const struct sockaddr *) &zeroAddress);

    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
    if (SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachabilityRef, &flags)) {
        if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsReachable) == 0) {
            // if target host is not reachable
            return NO;
        }

        if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionRequired) == 0) {
            // if target host is reachable and no connection is required
            //  then we'll assume (for now) that your on Wi-Fi
            return YES; // This is a wifi connection.
        }


        if ((((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnDemand ) != 0)
            ||(flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnTraffic) != 0)) {
            // ... and the connection is on-demand (or on-traffic) if the
            //     calling application is using the CFSocketStream or higher APIs

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsInterventionRequired) == 0) {
                // ... and no [user] intervention is needed
                return YES; // This is a wifi connection.
            }
        }

        if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN) == kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN) {
            // ... but WWAN connections are OK if the calling application
            //     is using the CFNetwork (CFSocketStream?) APIs.
            return YES; // This is a cellular connection.
        }
    }

    return NO;
}



Try this code:

- (BOOL)connectedToInternet
{
   NSURL *url=[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.google.com"];
   NSMutableURLRequest *request=[NSMutableURLRequest requestWithURL:url];
   [request setHTTPMethod:@"HEAD"];
   NSHTTPURLResponse *response;
   [NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest:request returningResponse:&response error: NULL];

   return ([response statusCode]==200)?YES:NO;
}



How to check internet connection on iOS device?

Use this code and import Reachability.h file

if ([[Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection]currentReachabilityStatus]==NotReachable)
    {
         //connection unavailable
    }
    else
    {
         //connection available
    }



First Download Reachability classes from this Link:
Rechability from Github

Add Instance of Reachability in AppDelegate.h

@property (nonatomic) Reachability *hostReachability;
@property (nonatomic) Reachability *internetReachability;
@property (nonatomic) Reachability *wifiReachability;

Import Reachability in your AppDelegate and just copy and past this code in your Appdelegate.m

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil)
    {
        //[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(reachabilityChanged:) name:kReachabilityChangedNotification object:nil];
        NSString *remoteHostName = @"www.google.com";
        self.hostReachability = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostName:remoteHostName];
        [self.hostReachability startNotifier];

        self.internetReachability = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
        [self.internetReachability startNotifier];

        self.wifiReachability = [Reachability reachabilityForLocalWiFi];
        [self.wifiReachability startNotifier];
    }
    return self;
}  

Add this method in your Common Class.

/*================================================================================================
 Check Internet Rechability
 =================================================================================================*/
+(BOOL)checkIfInternetIsAvailable
{
    BOOL reachable = NO;
    NetworkStatus netStatus = [APP_DELEGATE1.internetReachability currentReachabilityStatus];
    if(netStatus == ReachableViaWWAN || netStatus == ReachableViaWiFi)
    {
        reachable = YES;
    }
    else
    {
        reachable = NO;
    }
    return reachable;
}  

Note that APP_DELEGATE1 Is an instance of AppDelegate

/* AppDelegate object */
#define APP_DELEGATE1 ((AppDelegate*)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate])  

You can check internet connectivity anywhere in app using this method.




it's simple , you can use following method to check internet connection .

-(BOOL)IsConnectionAvailable
{
    Reachability *reachability = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];

    NetworkStatus networkStatus = [reachability currentReachabilityStatus];

    return !(networkStatus == NotReachable);    
}



No Internet Connection Handling on UIWebView and NSURLRequest

I would look at Apple's Reachability sample code to implement this reliably. One advantage of this approach is that you can notify the user as to current network status even the user isn't actually clicking on any links in the web view.




please check the following 1 2 3




1>Add SystemConfiguration.framework to your project

2>import following .h files in your Connection.h file

#import <sys/socket.h>
#import <netinet/in.h>
#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>

3>declare the following class method in your Connection.h file

+(BOOL)hasConnectivity;

4>define this method in your Connection.m file

+(BOOL)hasConnectivity {

struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;

SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(kCFAllocatorDefault, (const struct sockaddr*)&zeroAddress);
if(reachability != NULL) {
    //NetworkStatus retVal = NotReachable;
    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
    if (SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags)) {
        if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsReachable) == 0)
        {
            // if target host is not reachable
            return NO;
        }

        if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionRequired) == 0)
        {
            // if target host is reachable and no connection is required
            //  then we'll assume (for now) that your on Wi-Fi
            return YES;
        }


        if ((((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnDemand ) != 0) ||
             (flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnTraffic) != 0))
        {
            // ... and the connection is on-demand (or on-traffic) if the
            //     calling application is using the CFSocketStream or higher APIs

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsInterventionRequired) == 0)
            {
                // ... and no [user] intervention is needed
                return YES;
            }
        }

        if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN) == kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN)
        {
            // ... but WWAN connections are OK if the calling application
            //     is using the CFNetwork (CFSocketStream?) APIs.
            return YES;
        }
    }
}

return NO;
}