[memory-management] What and where are the stack and heap?


Answers

Stack:

  • Stored in computer RAM just like the heap.
  • Variables created on the stack will go out of scope and are automatically deallocated.
  • Much faster to allocate in comparison to variables on the heap.
  • Implemented with an actual stack data structure.
  • Stores local data, return addresses, used for parameter passing.
  • Can have a stack overflow when too much of the stack is used (mostly from infinite or too deep recursion, very large allocations).
  • Data created on the stack can be used without pointers.
  • You would use the stack if you know exactly how much data you need to allocate before compile time and it is not too big.
  • Usually has a maximum size already determined when your program starts.

Heap:

  • Stored in computer RAM just like the stack.
  • In C++, variables on the heap must be destroyed manually and never fall out of scope. The data is freed with delete, delete[], or free.
  • Slower to allocate in comparison to variables on the stack.
  • Used on demand to allocate a block of data for use by the program.
  • Can have fragmentation when there are a lot of allocations and deallocations.
  • In C++ or C, data created on the heap will be pointed to by pointers and allocated with new or malloc respectively.
  • Can have allocation failures if too big of a buffer is requested to be allocated.
  • You would use the heap if you don't know exactly how much data you will need at run time or if you need to allocate a lot of data.
  • Responsible for memory leaks.

Example:

int foo()
{
  char *pBuffer; //<--nothing allocated yet (excluding the pointer itself, which is allocated here on the stack).
  bool b = true; // Allocated on the stack.
  if(b)
  {
    //Create 500 bytes on the stack
    char buffer[500];

    //Create 500 bytes on the heap
    pBuffer = new char[500];

   }//<-- buffer is deallocated here, pBuffer is not
}//<--- oops there's a memory leak, I should have called delete[] pBuffer;
Question

Programming language books explain that value types are created on the stack, and reference types are created on the heap, without explaining what these two things are. I haven't read a clear explanation of this. I understand what a stack is, but where and what are they (physically in a real computer's memory)?

  • To what extent are they controlled by the OS or language runtime?
  • What is their scope?
  • What determines the size of each of them?
  • What makes one faster?



What is a stack?

A stack is a pile of objects, typically one that is neatly arranged.

Stacks in computing architectures are regions of memory where data is added or removed in a last-in-first-out manner.
In a multi-threaded application, each thread will have its own stack.

What is a heap?

A heap is an untidy collection of things piled up haphazardly.

In computing architectures the heap is an area of dynamically-allocated memory that is managed automatically by the operating system or the memory manager library.
Memory on the heap is allocated, deallocated, and resized regularly during program execution, and this can lead to a problem called fragmentation.
Fragmentation occurs when memory objects are allocated with small spaces in between that are too small to hold additional memory objects.
The net result is a percentage of the heap space that is not usable for further memory allocations.

Both together

In a multi-threaded application, each thread will have its own stack. But, all the different threads will share the heap.
Because the different threads share the heap in a multi-threaded application, this also means that there has to be some coordination between the threads so that they don’t try to access and manipulate the same piece(s) of memory in the heap at the same time.

Which is faster – the stack or the heap? And why?

The stack is much faster than the heap.
This is because of the way that memory is allocated on the stack.
Allocating memory on the stack is as simple as moving the stack pointer up.

For people new to programming, it’s probably a good idea to use the stack since it’s easier.
Because the stack is small, you would want to use it when you know exactly how much memory you will need for your data, or if you know the size of your data is very small.
It’s better to use the heap when you know that you will need a lot of memory for your data, or you just are not sure how much memory you will need (like with a dynamic array).

Java Memory Model

The stack is the area of memory where local variables (including method parameters) are stored. When it comes to object variables, these are merely references (pointers) to the actual objects on the heap.
Every time an object is instantiated, a chunk of heap memory is set aside to hold the data (state) of that object. Since objects can contain other objects, some of this data can in fact hold references to those nested objects.




(I have moved this answer from another question that was more or less a dupe of this one.)

The answer to your question is implementation specific and may vary across compilers and processor architectures. However, here is a simplified explanation.

  • Both the stack and the heap are memory areas allocated from the underlying operating system (often virtual memory that is mapped to physical memory on demand).
  • In a multi-threaded environment each thread will have its own completely independent stack but they will share the heap. Concurrent access has to be controlled on the heap and is not possible on the stack.

The heap

  • The heap contains a linked list of used and free blocks. New allocations on the heap (by new or malloc) are satisfied by creating a suitable block from one of the free blocks. This requires updating list of blocks on the heap. This meta information about the blocks on the heap is also stored on the heap often in a small area just in front of every block.
  • As the heap grows new blocks are often allocated from lower addresses towards higher addresses. Thus you can think of the heap as a heap of memory blocks that grows in size as memory is allocated. If the heap is too small for an allocation the size can often be increased by acquiring more memory from the underlying operating system.
  • Allocating and deallocating many small blocks may leave the heap in a state where there are a lot of small free blocks interspersed between the used blocks. A request to allocate a large block may fail because none of the free blocks are large enough to satisfy the allocation request even though the combined size of the free blocks may be large enough. This is called heap fragmentation.
  • When a used block that is adjacent to a free block is deallocated the new free block may be merged with the adjacent free block to create a larger free block effectively reducing the fragmentation of the heap.

The stack

  • The stack often works in close tandem with a special register on the CPU named the stack pointer. Initially the stack pointer points to the top of the stack (the highest address on the stack).
  • The CPU has special instructions for pushing values onto the stack and popping them back from the stack. Each push stores the value at the current location of the stack pointer and decreases the stack pointer. A pop retrieves the value pointed to by the stack pointer and then increases the stack pointer (don't be confused by the fact that adding a value to the stack decreases the stack pointer and removing a value increases it. Remember that the stack grows to the bottom). The values stored and retrieved are the values of the CPU registers.
  • When a function is called the CPU uses special instructions that push the current instruction pointer, i.e. the address of the code executing on the stack. The CPU then jumps to the function by setting the instruction pointer to the address of the function called. Later, when the function returns, the old instruction pointer is popped from the stack and execution resumes at the code just after the call to the function.
  • When a function is entered, the stack pointer is decreased to allocate more space on the stack for local (automatic) variables. If the function has one local 32 bit variable four bytes are set aside on the stack. When the function returns, the stack pointer is moved back to free the allocated area.
  • If a function has parameters, these are pushed onto the stack before the call to the function. The code in the function is then able to navigate up the stack from the current stack pointer to locate these values.
  • Nesting function calls work like a charm. Each new call will allocate function parameters, the return address and space for local variables and these activation records can be stacked for nested calls and will unwind in the correct way when the functions return.
  • As the stack is a limited block of memory, you can cause a by calling too many nested functions and/or allocating too much space for local variables. Often the memory area used for the stack is set up in such a way that writing below the bottom (the lowest address) of the stack will trigger a trap or exception in the CPU. This exceptional condition can then be caught by the runtime and converted into some kind of exception.

Can a function be allocated on the heap instead of a stack?

No, activation records for functions (i.e. local or automatic variables) are allocated on the stack that is used not only to store these variables, but also to keep track of nested function calls.

How the heap is managed is really up to the runtime environment. C uses malloc and C++ uses new, but many other languages have garbage collection.

However, the stack is a more low-level feature closely tied to the processor architecture. Growing the heap when there is not enough space isn't too hard since it can be implemented in the library call that handles the heap. However, growing the stack is often impossible as the only is discovered when it is too late; and shutting down the thread of execution is the only viable option.




  • Introduction

Physical memory is the range of the physical addresses of the memory cells in which an application or system stores its data, code, and so on during execution. Memory management denotes the managing of these physical addresses by swapping the data from physical memory to a storage device and then back to physical memory when needed. The OS implements the memory management services using virtual memory. As a C# application developer you do not need to write any memory management services. The CLR uses the underlying OS memory management services to provide the memory model for C# or any other high-level language targeting the CLR.

Figure 4-1 shows physical memory that has been abstracted and managed by the OS, using the virtual memory concept. Virtual memory is the abstract view of the physical memory, managed by the OS. Virtual memory is simply a series of virtual addresses, and these virtual addresses are translated by the CPU into the physical address when needed.

Figure 4-1. CLR memory abstraction

The CLR provides the memory management abstract layer for the virtual execution environment, using the operating memory services. The abstracted concepts the CLR uses are AppDomain, thread, stack, heapmemorymapped file, and so on. The concept of the application domain (AppDomain) gives your application an isolated execution environment.

  • Memory Interaction between the CLR and OS

By looking at the stack trace while debugging the following C# application, using WinDbg, you will see how the CLR uses the underlying OS memory management services (e.g., the HeapFree method from KERNEL32.dll, the RtlpFreeHeap method from ntdll.dll) to implement its own memory model:

using System;
namespace CH_04
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Book book = new Book();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Book
    {
        public void Print() { Console.WriteLine(ToString()); }
    }
}

The compiled assembly of the program is loaded into WinDbg to start debugging. You use the following commands to initialize the debugging session:

0:000> sxe ld clrjit

0:000> g

0:000> .loadby sos clr

0:000> .load C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\sos.dll

Then, you set a breakpoint at the Main method of the Program class, using the !bpmd command:

0:000>!bpmd CH_04.exe CH_04.Program.Main

To continue the execution and break at the breakpoint, execute the g command:

0:000> g

When the execution breaks at the breakpoint, you use the !eestack command to view the stack trace details of all threads running for the current process. The following output shows the stack trace for all the threads running for the application CH_04.exe:

0:000> !eestack


Thread 0

Current frame: (MethodDesc 00233800 +0 CH_04.Program.Main(System.String[]))

ChildEBP RetAddr Caller, Callee

0022ed24 5faf21db clr!CallDescrWorker+0x33

/trace removed/

0022f218 77712d68 ntdll!RtlFreeHeap+0x142, calling ntdll!RtlpFreeHeap

0022f238 771df1ac KERNEL32!HeapFree+0x14, calling ntdll!RtlFreeHeap

0022f24c 5fb4c036 clr!EEHeapFree+0x36, calling KERNEL32!HeapFree

0022f260 5fb4c09d clr!EEHeapFreeInProcessHeap+0x24, calling clr!EEHeapFree

0022f274 5fb4c06d clr!operator delete[]+0x30, calling clr!EEHeapFreeInProcessHeap /trace removed/

0022f4d0 7771316f ntdll!RtlpFreeHeap+0xb7a, calling ntdll!_SEH_epilog4

0022f4d4 77712d68 ntdll!RtlFreeHeap+0x142, calling ntdll!RtlpFreeHeap

0022f4f4 771df1ac KERNEL32!HeapFree+0x14, calling ntdll!RtlFreeHeap

/trace removed/

This stack trace indicates that the CLR uses OS memory management services to implement its own memory model. Any memory operation in.NET goes via the CLR memory layer to the OS memory management layer.

Figure 4-2 illustrates a typical C# application memory model used by the CLR at runtime.

Figure 4-2. A typical C# application memory model

The CLR memory model is tightly coupled with the OS memory management services. To understand the CLR memory model, it is important to understand the underlying OS memory model. It is also crucial to know how the physical memory address space is abstracted into the virtual memory address space, the ways the virtual address space is being used by the user application and system application, how virtual-to-physical address mapping works, how memory-mapped file works, and so on. This background knowledge will improve your grasp of CLR memory model concepts, including AppDomain, stack, and heap.

For more information, refer to this book:

C# Deconstructed: Discover how C# works on the .NET Framework

This book + ClrViaC# + Windows Internals are excellent resources to known .net framework in depth and relation with OS.




I have something to share with you, although major points are already penned.

Stack

  • Very fast access.
  • Stored in RAM.
  • Function calls are loaded here along with the local variables and function parameters passed.
  • Space is freed automatically when program goes out of a scope.
  • Stored in sequential memory.

Heap

  • Slow access comparatively to Stack.
  • Stored in RAM.
  • Dynamically created variables are stored here, which later requires freeing the allocated memory after use.
  • Stored wherever memory allocation is done, accessed by pointer always.

Interesting note:

  • Should the function calls had been stored in heap, it would had resulted in 2 messy points:
    1. Due to sequential storage in stack, execution is faster. Storage in heap would have resulted in huge time consumption thus resulting whole program to execute slower.
    2. If functions were stored in heap (messy storage pointed by pointer), there would have been no way to return to the caller address back (which stack gives due to sequential storage in memory).

Feedbacks are wellcomed.




Simply, the stack is where local variables get created. Also, every time you call a subroutine the program counter (pointer to the next machine instruction) and any important registers, and sometimes the parameters get pushed on the stack. Then any local variables inside the subroutine are pushed onto the stack (and used from there). When the subroutine finishes, that stuff all gets popped back off the stack. The PC and register data gets and put back where it was as it is popped, so your program can go on its merry way.

The heap is the area of memory dynamic memory allocations are made out of (explicit "new" or "allocate" calls). It is a special data structure that can keep track of blocks of memory of varying sizes and their allocation status.

In "classic" systems RAM was laid out such that the stack pointer started out at the bottom of memory, the heap pointer started out at the top, and they grew towards each other. If they overlap, you are out of RAM. That doesn't work with modern multi-threaded OSes though. Every thread has to have its own stack, and those can get created dynamicly.




A couple of cents: I think, it will be good to draw memory graphical and more simple:


Arrows - show where grow stack and heap, process stack size have limit, defined in OS, thread stack size limits by parameters in thread create API usually. Heap usually limiting by process maximum virtual memory size, for 32 bit 2-4 GB for example.

So simple way: process heap is general for process and all threads inside, using for memory allocation in common case with something like malloc().

Stack is quick memory for store in common case function return pointers and variables, processed as parameters in function call, local function variables.




OK, simply and in short words, they mean ordered and not ordered...!

Stack: In stack items, things get on the top of each-other, means gonna be faster and more efficient to be processed!...

So there is always an index to point the specific item, also processing gonna be faster, there is relationship between the items as well!...

Heap: No order, processing gonna be slower and values are messed up together with no specific order or index... there are random and there is no relationship between them... so execution and usage time could be vary...

I also create the image below to show how they may look like:




I think many other people have given you mostly correct answers on this matter.

One detail that has been missed, however, is that the "heap" should in fact probably be called the "free store". The reason for this distinction is that the original free store was implemented with a data structure known as a "binomial heap." For that reason, allocating from early implementations of malloc()/free() was allocation from a heap. However, in this modern day, most free stores are implemented with very elaborate data structures that are not binomial heaps.




Others have answered the broad strokes pretty well, so I'll throw in a few details.

  1. Stack and heap need not be singular. A common situation in which you have more than one stack is if you have more than one thread in a process. In this case each thread has its own stack. You can also have more than one heap, for example some DLL configurations can result in different DLLs allocating from different heaps, which is why it's generally a bad idea to release memory allocated by a different library.

  2. In C you can get the benefit of variable length allocation through the use of alloca, which allocates on the stack, as opposed to alloc, which allocates on the heap. This memory won't survive your return statement, but it's useful for a scratch buffer.

  3. Making a huge temporary buffer on Windows that you don't use much of is not free. This is because the compiler will generate a stack probe loop that is called every time your function is entered to make sure the stack exists (because Windows uses a single guard page at the end of your stack to detect when it needs to grow the stack. If you access memory more than one page off the end of the stack you will crash). Example:

void myfunction()
{
   char big[10000000];
   // Do something that only uses for first 1K of big 99% of the time.
}



Stack

  • Very fast access
  • Don't have to explicitly de-allocate variables
  • Space is managed efficiently by CPU, memory will not become fragmented
  • Local variables only
  • Limit on stack size (OS-dependent)
  • Variables cannot be resized

Heap

  • Variables can be accessed globally
  • No limit on memory size
  • (Relatively) slower access
  • No guaranteed efficient use of space, memory may become fragmented over time as blocks of memory are allocated, then freed
  • You must manage memory (you're in charge of allocating and freeing variables)
  • Variables can be resized using realloc()



The Stack When you call a function the arguments to that function plus some other overhead is put on the stack. Some info (such as where to go on return) is also stored there. When you declare a variable inside your function, that variable is also allocated on the stack.

Deallocating the stack is pretty simple because you always deallocate in the reverse order in which you allocate. Stack stuff is added as you enter functions, the corresponding data is removed as you exit them. This means that you tend to stay within a small region of the stack unless you call lots of functions that call lots of other functions (or create a recursive solution).

The Heap The heap is a generic name for where you put the data that you create on the fly. If you don't know how many spaceships your program is going to create, you are likely to use the new (or malloc or equivalent) operator to create each spaceship. This allocation is going to stick around for a while, so it is likely we will free things in a different order than we created them.

Thus, the heap is far more complex, because there end up being regions of memory that are unused interleaved with chunks that are - memory gets fragmented. Finding free memory of the size you need is a difficult problem. This is why the heap should be avoided (though it is still often used).

Implementation Implementation of both the stack and heap is usually down to the runtime / OS. Often games and other applications that are performance critical create their own memory solutions that grab a large chunk of memory from the heap and then dish it out internally to avoid relying on the OS for memory.

This is only practical if your memory usage is quite different from the norm - i.e for games where you load a level in one huge operation and can chuck the whole lot away in another huge operation.

Physical location in memory This is less relevant than you think because of a technology called Virtual Memory which makes your program think that you have access to a certain address where the physical data is somewhere else (even on the hard disc!). The addresses you get for the stack are in increasing order as your call tree gets deeper. The addresses for the heap are un-predictable (i.e implimentation specific) and frankly not important.






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