email-validation verify exists - C# code to validate email address



15 Answers

This is an old question, but all the answers I've found on SO, including more recent ones, are answered similarly to this one. However, in .Net 4.5 / MVC 4 you can add email address validation to a form by adding the [EmailAddress] annotation from System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations, so I was wondering why I couldn't just use the built-in functionality from .Net in general.

This seems to work, and seems to me to be fairly elegant:

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

class ValidateSomeEmails
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var foo = new EmailAddressAttribute();
        bool bar;
        bar = foo.IsValid("someone@somewhere.com");         //true
        bar = foo.IsValid("someone@somewhere.co.uk");       //true
        bar = foo.IsValid("someone+tag@somewhere.net");     //true
        bar = foo.IsValid("futureTLD@somewhere.fooo");      //true

        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa");                          //false
        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa@");                         //false
        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa@fdsa");                     //false
        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa@fdsa.");                    //false

        //one-liner
        if (new EmailAddressAttribute().IsValid("someone@somewhere.com"))
            bar = true;    
    }
}
.net regex in

What is the most elegant code to validate that a string is a valid email address?




I took Phil's answer from #1 and created this class. Call it like this: bool isValid = Validator.EmailIsValid(emailString);

Here is the class:

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public static class Validator
{

    static Regex ValidEmailRegex = CreateValidEmailRegex();

    /// <summary>
    /// Taken from http://haacked.com/archive/2007/08/21/i-knew-how-to-validate-an-email-address-until-i.aspx
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static Regex CreateValidEmailRegex()
    {
        string validEmailPattern = @"^(?!\.)(""([^""\r\\]|\\[""\r\\])*""|"
            + @"([-a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~]|(?<!\.)\.)*)(?<!\.)"
            + @"@[a-z0-9][\w\.-]*[a-z0-9]\.[a-z][a-z\.]*[a-z]$";

        return new Regex(validEmailPattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    }

    internal static bool EmailIsValid(string emailAddress)
    {
        bool isValid = ValidEmailRegex.IsMatch(emailAddress);

        return isValid;
    }
}



Personally, I would say that you should just make sure there is an @ symbol in there, with possibly a . character. There's many regexes you could use of varying correctness, but I think most of these leave out valid email addresses, or let invalid ones through. If people want to put in a fake email address, they will put in a fake one. If you need to verify that the email address is legit, and that the person is in control of that email address, then you will need to send them an email with a special coded link so they can verify that it indeed is a real address.




The most elegant way is to use .Net's built in methods.

These methods:

  • Are tried and tested. These methods are used in my own professional projects.

  • Use regular expressions internally, which are reliable and fast.

  • Made by Microsoft for C#. There's no need to reinvent the wheel.

  • Return a bool result. True means the email is valid.

For users of .Net 4.5 and greater

Add this Reference to your project:

System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations

Now you can use the following code:

(new EmailAddressAttribute().IsValid("youremailhere@test.test"));

Example of use

Here are some methods to declare:

protected List<string> GetRecipients() // Gets recipients from TextBox named `TxtRecipients`
{
    List<string> MethodResult = null;

    try
    {
        List<string> Recipients = TxtRecipients.Text.Replace(",",";").Replace(" ", "").Split(';').ToList();

        List<string> RecipientsCleaned = new List<string>();

        foreach (string Recipient in RecipientsCleaned)
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(Recipient))
            {
                RecipientsNoBlanks.Add(Recipient);

            }

        }

        MethodResult = RecipientsNoBlanks;

    }
    catch//(Exception ex)
    {
        //ex.HandleException();
    }

    return MethodResult;

}


public static bool IsValidEmailAddresses(List<string> recipients)
{
    List<string> InvalidAddresses = GetInvalidEmailAddresses(recipients);

    return InvalidAddresses != null && InvalidAddresses.Count == 0;

}

public static List<string> GetInvalidEmailAddresses(List<string> recipients)
{
    List<string> MethodResult = null;

    try
    {
        List<string> InvalidEmailAddresses = new List<string>();

        foreach (string Recipient in recipients)
        {
            if (!(new EmailAddressAttribute().IsValid(Recipient)) && !InvalidEmailAddresses.Contains(Recipient))
            {
                InvalidEmailAddresses.Add(Recipient);

            }

        }

        MethodResult = InvalidEmailAddresses;

    }
    catch//(Exception ex)
    {
        //ex.HandleException();

    }

    return MethodResult;

}

...and code demonstrating them in action:

List<string> Recipients = GetRecipients();

bool IsValidEmailAddresses = IsValidEmailAddresses(Recipients);

if (IsValidEmailAddresses)
{
    //Emails are valid. Your code here

}
else
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    sb.Append("The following addresses are invalid:");

    List<string> InvalidEmails = GetInvalidEmailAddresses(Recipients);

    foreach (string InvalidEmail in InvalidEmails)
    {
        sb.Append("\n" + InvalidEmail);

    }

    MessageBox.Show(sb.ToString());

}

In addition, this example:

  • Extends beyond the spec since a single string is used to contain 0, one or many email addresses sperated by a semi-colon ;.
  • Clearly demonstrates how to use the IsValid method of the EmailAddressAttribute object.

Alternative, for users of a version of .Net less than 4.5

For situations where .Net 4.5 is not available, I use the following solution:

Specifically, I use:

public static bool IsValidEmailAddress(string emailAddress)
{
    bool MethodResult = false;

    try
    {
        MailAddress m = new MailAddress(emailAddress);

        MethodResult = m.Address == emailAddress;

    }
    catch //(Exception ex)
    {
        //ex.HandleException();

    }

    return MethodResult;

}

public static List<string> GetInvalidEmailAddresses(List<string> recipients)
{
    List<string> MethodResult = null;

    try
    {
        List<string> InvalidEmailAddresses = new List<string>();

        foreach (string Recipient in recipients)
        {
            if (!IsValidEmail(Recipient) && !InvalidEmailAddresses.Contains(Recipient))
            {
                InvalidEmailAddresses.Add(Recipient);

            }

        }

        MethodResult = InvalidEmailAddresses;

    }
    catch //(Exception ex)
    {
        //ex.HandleException();

    }

    return MethodResult;

}



I find this regex to be a good trade off between checking for something more than just the @ mark, and accepting weird edge cases:

^[^@\s]+@[^@\s]+(\.[^@\s]+)+$

It will at least make you put something around the @ mark, and put at least a normal looking domain.




Email address validation is not as easy as it might seem. It's actually theoretically impossible to fully validate an email address using just a regular expression.

Check out my blog post about it for a discussion on the subject and a F# implementation using FParsec. [/shameless_plug]




If you really and I mean really want to know if an email address is valid...ask the mail exchanger to prove it, no regex needed. I can provide the code if requested.

General steps are as follows: 1. does email address have a domain name part? (index of @ > 0) 2. using a DNS query ask if domain has a mail exchanger 3. open tcp connection to mail exchanger 4. using the smtp protocol, open a message to the server using the email address as the reciever 5. parse the server's response. 6. quit the message if you made it this far, everything is good.

This is as you can imagine, very expensive time wise and relies on smtp, but it does work.




Check email string is right format or wrong format by System.Text.RegularExpressions:

    public static bool IsValidEmailId(string InputEmail)
    {
        Regex regex = new Regex(@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,3})+)$");
        Match match = regex.Match(InputEmail);
        if (match.Success)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    protected void Email_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        String UserEmail = Email.Text;
        if (IsValidEmailId(UserEmail))
        {
            Label4.Text = "This email is correct formate";
        }
        else
        {
            Label4.Text = "This email isn't correct formate";
        }
    }



/Using the Internal Regex used in creating the "new EmailAddressAttribute();" component in .Net4.5 >>> using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations; //To Validate an Email Address......Tested and Working.

public bool IsEmail(string email)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(email))
    {   return false;  }
    try
    {
        Regex _regex = new Regex("^((([a-z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])" +
                "+(\\.([a-z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])+)*)|((\\x22)" +
                "((((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(([\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x7f]|\\x21|[\\x23-\\x5b]|[\\x5d-\\x7e]|" +
                "[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(\\\\([\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0d-\\x7f]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\u" +
                "FDF0-\\uFFEF]))))*(((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(\\x22)))@((([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|" +
                "(([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])([a-z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\\d|" +
                "[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])))\\.)+(([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900" +
                "-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])([a-z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFF" +
                "EF])))\\.?$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture | RegexOptions.Compiled);
        return _regex.IsMatch(email);
    }
    catch (RegexMatchTimeoutException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Also, You can use this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/01escwtf(v=vs.110).aspx




There are a lot of strong answers here. However, I recommend that we take a step back. @Cogwheel answers the question https://.com/a/1374644/388267. Nevertheless, it could be costly in a bulk validation scenario, if many of the email address being validated are invalid. I suggest that we employ a bit of logic before we enter into his try-catch block. I know that the following code could be written using RegEx but that could be costly for new developers to understand. This is my twopence worth:

    public static bool IsEmail(this string input)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(input)) return false;

        // MUST CONTAIN ONE AND ONLY ONE @
        var atCount = input.Count(c => c == '@');
        if (atCount != 1) return false;

        // MUST CONTAIN PERIOD
        if (!input.Contains(".")) return false;

        // @ MUST OCCUR BEFORE LAST PERIOD
        var indexOfAt = input.IndexOf("@", StringComparison.Ordinal);
        var lastIndexOfPeriod = input.LastIndexOf(".", StringComparison.Ordinal);
        var atBeforeLastPeriod = lastIndexOfPeriod > indexOfAt;
        if (!atBeforeLastPeriod) return false;

        // CODE FROM COGWHEEL'S ANSWER: https://.com/a/1374644/388267 
        try
        {
            var addr = new System.Net.Mail.MailAddress(input);
            return addr.Address == input;
        }
        catch
        {
            return false;
        }
    }



I succinctified Poyson 1's answer like so:

public static bool IsValidEmailAddress(string candidateEmailAddr)
{
    string regexExpresion = "\\w+([-+.']\\w+)*@\\w+([-.]\\w+)*\\.\\w+([-.]\\w+)*";
    return (Regex.IsMatch(candidateEmailAddr, regexExpresion)) && 
           (Regex.Replace(candidateEmailAddr, regexExpresion, string.Empty).Length == 0);
}



Simple way to identify the emailid is valid or not.

public static bool EmailIsValid(string email)
{
        return Regex.IsMatch(email, @"^([\w-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([\w-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$");
}



I ended up using this regex, as it successfully validates commas, comments, Unicode characters and IP(v4) domain addresses.

Valid addresses will be:

" "@example.org

(comment)test@example.org

тест@example.org

ტესტი@example.org

test@[192.168.1.1]

 public const string REGEX_EMAIL = @"^(((\([\w!#$%&'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]*\))?[^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@\""]+(\.[^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@\""]+)*)|(\"".+\""))(\([\w!#$%&'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]*\))?@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$";



Based on the answer of @Cogwheel i want to share a modified solution that works for SSIS and the "Script Component":

  1. Place the "Script Component" into your Data Flow connect and then open it.
  2. In the section "Input Columns" set the field that contains the E-Mail Adresses to "ReadWrite" (in the example 'fieldName').
  3. Switch back to the section "Script" and click on "Edit Script". Then you need to wait after the code opens.
  4. Place this code in the right method:

    public override void Input0_ProcessInputRow(Input0Buffer Row)
    {
        string email = Row.fieldName;
    
        try
        {
            System.Net.Mail.MailAddress addr = new System.Net.Mail.MailAddress(email);
            Row.fieldName= addr.Address.ToString();
        }
        catch
        {
            Row.fieldName = "WRONGADDRESS";
        }
    }
    

Then you can use a Conditional Split to filter out all invalid records or whatever you want to do.




The most voted answer from @Cogwheel is best answer however i have tried to implement trim() string method so it will trim all user white space from string start to end. Check the code bellow for full example-

bool IsValidEmail(string email)
{
    try
    {
        email = email.Trim();
        var addr = new System.Net.Mail.MailAddress(email);
        return addr.Address == email;
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}



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