[c#] How can I make the cursor turn to the wait cursor?


3 Answers

Actually,

Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;

temporarily sets the Wait cursor, but doesn’t ensure that the Wait cursor shows until the end of your operation. Other programs or controls within your program can easily reset the cursor back to the default arrow as in fact happens when you move mouse while operation is still running.

A much better way to show the Wait cursor is to set the UseWaitCursor property in a form to true:

form.UseWaitCursor = true;

This will display wait cursor for all controls on the form until you set this property to false. If you want wait cursor to be shown on Application level you should use:

Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
Question

I have a C# application that has users login to it, and because the hashing algorithm is expensive, it takes a little while to do. How can I display the Wait/Busy Cursor (usually the hourglass) to the user to let them know the program is doing something?

The project is in C#.




OK so I created a static async method. That disabled the control that launches the action and changes the application cursor. It runs the action as a task and waits for to finish. Control returns to the caller while it waits. So the application remains responsive, even while the busy icon spins.

async public static void LengthyOperation(Control control, Action action)
{
    try
    {
        control.Enabled = false;
        Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
        Task doWork = new Task(() => action(), TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
        Log.Info("Task Start");
        doWork.Start();
        Log.Info("Before Await");
        await doWork;
        Log.Info("After await");
    }
    finally
    {
        Log.Info("Finally");
        Application.UseWaitCursor = false;
        control.Enabled = true;
    }

Here's the code form the main form

    private void btnSleep_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var control = sender as Control;
        if (control != null)
        {
            Log.Info("Launching lengthy operation...");
            CursorWait.LengthyOperation(control, () => DummyAction());
            Log.Info("...Lengthy operation launched.");
        }

    }

    private void DummyAction()
    {
        try
        {
            var _log = NLog.LogManager.GetLogger("TmpLogger");
            _log.Info("Action - Sleep");
            TimeSpan sleep = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 16);
            Thread.Sleep(sleep);
            _log.Info("Action - Wakeup");
        }
        finally
        {
        }
    }

I had to use a separate logger for the dummy action (I am using Nlog) and my main logger is writing to the UI (a rich text box). I wasn't able to get the busy cursor show only when over a particular container on the form (but I didn't try very hard.) All controls have a UseWaitCursor property, but it doesn't seem have any effect on the controls I tried (maybe because they weren't on top?)

Here's the main log, which shows things happening in the order we expect:

16:51:33.1064 Launching lengthy operation...
16:51:33.1215 Task Start
16:51:33.1215 Before Await
16:51:33.1215 ...Lengthy operation launched.
16:51:49.1276 After await
16:51:49.1537 Finally



It is easier to use UseWaitCursor at the Form or Window level. A typical use case can look like below:

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        try
        {
            this.Enabled = false;//optional, better target a panel or specific controls
            this.UseWaitCursor = true;//from the Form/Window instance
            Application.DoEvents();//messages pumped to update controls
            //execute a lengthy blocking operation here, 
            //bla bla ....
        }
        finally
        {
            this.Enabled = true;//optional
            this.UseWaitCursor = false;
        }
    }

For a better UI experience you should use Asynchrony from a different thread.




Okey,Other people's view are very clear, but I would like to do some added, as follow:

Cursor tempCursor = Cursor.Current;

Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;

//do Time-consuming Operations         

Cursor.Current = tempCursor;





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