[linux] How to get full path of a file?


Answers

I suppose you are using Linux.

I found a utility called realpath in coreutils 8.15.

realpath realpath
/data/ail_data/transformed_binaries/coreutils/test_folder_realpath/realpath
Question

Is there an easy way I can print the full path of file.txt ?

file.txt = /nfs/an/disks/jj/home/dir/file.txt

The <command>

dir> <command> file.txt  

should print

/nfs/an/disks/jj/home/dir/file.txt



In Mac OSX, do the following steps:

  1. cd into the directory of the target file.
  2. Type either of the following terminal commands.
Terminal
ls "`pwd`/file.txt"
echo $(pwd)/file.txt
  1. Replace file.txt with your actual file name.
  2. Press Enter



the easiest way I found is

for i in `ls`; do echo "`pwd`/$i"; done

it works well for me




This will give you absolute path of the file:

find / -name file.txt 



echo $(cd $(dirname "$1") && pwd -P)/$(basename "$1")

This is explanation of what is going on at @ZeRemz's answer:

  1. This script get relative path as argument "$1"
  2. Then we get dirname part of that path (you can pass either dir or file to this script): dirname "$1"
  3. Then we cd "$(dirname "$1") into this relative dir
  4. && pwd -P and get absolute path for it. -P option will avoid all symlinks
  5. After that we append basename to absolute path: $(basename "$1")
  6. As final step we echo it



Usually:

find `pwd` | grep <filename>

Alternatively, just for the current folder:

find `pwd` -maxdepth 1 | grep <filename>



Another Linux utility, that does this job:

fname <file>



In windows you can

Hold shift and right click on a file which gives you can option called "Copy as Path"

This will copy the full path of the file to clipboard.

In Linux you can use :-

realpath yourfile to get the full path of a file as suggested by many.




find / -samefile file.txt -print

Will find all the links to the file with the same inode number as file.txt

adding a -xdev flag will avoid find to cross device boundaries ("mount points"). (But this will probably cause nothing to be found if the find does not start at a directory on the same device as file.txt)

Do note that find can report multiple paths for a single filesystem object, because an Inode can be linked by more than one directory entry, possibly even using different names. For instance:

find /bin -samefile /bin/gunzip -ls

Will output:

12845178    4 -rwxr-xr-x   2 root     root         2251 feb  9  2012 /bin/uncompress
12845178    4 -rwxr-xr-x   2 root     root         2251 feb  9  2012 /bin/gunzip



In a similar scenario, I'm launching a cshell script from some other location. For setting the correct absolute path of the script so that it runs in the designated directory only, I'm using the following code:

set script_dir = `pwd`/`dirname $0`

$0 stores the exact string how the script was executed.

For e.g. if the script was launched like this: $> ../../test/test.csh, $script_dir will contain /home/abc/sandbox/v1/../../test




Beside "readlink -f" , another commonly used command:

$find  /the/long/path/but/I/can/use/TAB/to/auto/it/to/ -name myfile
/the/long/path/but/I/can/use/TAB/to/auto/it/to/myfile
$

This also give the full path and file name at console

Off-topic: This method just gives relative links, not absolute. The readlink -f command is the right one.




If you are in the same directory as the file:

ls "`pwd`/file.txt"

Replace file.txt with your target filename.




Works on Mac, Linux, *nix:

This will give you a quoted csv of all files in the current dir:

ls | xargs -I {} echo "$(pwd -P)/{}" | xargs | sed 's/ /","/g'

The output of this can be easily copied into a python list or any similar data structure.




I know there's an easier way that this, but darned if I can find it...

jcomeau@intrepid:~$ python -c 'import os; print(os.path.abspath("cat.wav"))'
/home/jcomeau/cat.wav

jcomeau@intrepid:~$ ls $PWD/cat.wav
/home/jcomeau/cat.wav



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