arrays object by - How do I remove a particular element from an array in JavaScript?



15 Answers

I don't know how you are expecting array.remove(int) to behave. There are three possibilities I can think of that you might be wanting.

To remove an element of an array at an index i:

array.splice(i, 1);

If you want to remove every element with value number from the array:

for(var i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if(array[i] === number) {
       array.splice(i, 1);
    }
}

If you just want to make the element at index i no longer exist, but you don't want the indexes of the other elements to change:

delete array[i];
value key property

I have an array of integers, and I'm using the .push() method to add elements to it.

Is there a simple way to remove a specific element from an array? The equivalent of something like array.remove(int);.

I have to use core JavaScript - no frameworks are allowed.




Depends on whether you want to keep an empty spot or not.

If you do want an empty slot, delete is fine:

delete array[ index ];

If you don't, you should use the splice method:

array.splice( index, 1 );

And if you need the value of that item, you can just store the returned array's element:

var value = array.splice( index, 1 )[0];

In case you want to do it in some order, you can use array.pop() for the last one or array.shift() for the first one (and both return the value of the item too).

And if you don't know the index of the item, you can use array.indexOf( item ) to get it (in a if() to get one item or in a while() to get all of them). array.indexOf( item ) returns either the index or -1 if not found. 




There are two major approaches:

  1. splice(): anArray.splice(index, 1);

  2. delete: delete anArray[index];

Be careful when you use delete for an array. It is good for deleting attributes of objects but not so good for arrays. It is better to use splice for arrays.

Keep in mind that when you use delete for an array you could get wrong results for anArray.length. In other words, delete would remove the element but wouldn't update the value of length property.

You can also expect to have holes in index numbers after using delete, e.g. you could end up with having indexes 1,3,4,8,9,11 and length as it was before using delete. In that case, all indexed for loops would crash, since indexes are no longer sequential.

If you are forced to use delete for some reason, then you should use for each loops when you need to loop through arrays. As the matter of fact, always avoid using indexed for loops, if possible. That way the code would be more robust and less prone to problems with indexes.




There is no need to use indexOf or splice. However, it performs better if you only want to remove one occurrence of an element.

Find and move (move):

function move(arr, val) {
  var j = 0;
  for (var i = 0, l = arr.length; i < l; i++) {
    if (arr[i] !== val) {
      arr[j++] = arr[i];
    }
  }
  arr.length = j;
}

Use indexOf and splice (indexof):

function indexof(arr, val) {
  var i;
  while ((i = arr.indexOf(val)) != -1) {
    arr.splice(i, 1);
  }
}

Use only splice (splice):

function splice(arr, val) {
  for (var i = arr.length; i--;) {
    if (arr[i] === val) {
      arr.splice(i, 1);
    }
  }
}

Run-times on nodejs for array with 1000 elements (average over 10000 runs):

indexof is approximately 10x slower than move. Even if improved by removing the call to indexOf in splice it performs much worse than move.

Remove all occurrences:
    move 0.0048 ms
    indexof 0.0463 ms
    splice 0.0359 ms

Remove first occurrence:
    move_one 0.0041 ms
    indexof_one 0.0021 ms



John Resig posted a good implementation:

// Array Remove - By John Resig (MIT Licensed)
Array.prototype.remove = function(from, to) {
  var rest = this.slice((to || from) + 1 || this.length);
  this.length = from < 0 ? this.length + from : from;
  return this.push.apply(this, rest);
};

If you don’t want to extend a global object, you can do something like the following, instead:

// Array Remove - By John Resig (MIT Licensed)
Array.remove = function(array, from, to) {
    var rest = array.slice((to || from) + 1 || array.length);
    array.length = from < 0 ? array.length + from : from;
    return array.push.apply(array, rest);
};

But the main reason I am posting this is to warn users against the alternative implementation suggested in the comments on that page (Dec 14, 2007):

Array.prototype.remove = function(from, to){
  this.splice(from, (to=[0,from||1,++to-from][arguments.length])<0?this.length+to:to);
  return this.length;
};

It seems to work well at first, but through a painful process I discovered it fails when trying to remove the second to last element in an array. For example, if you have a 10-element array and you try to remove the 9th element with this:

myArray.remove(8);

You end up with an 8-element array. Don't know why but I confirmed John's original implementation doesn't have this problem.




You can do it easily with filter method:

function remove(arrOriginal, elementToRemove){
    return arrOriginal.filter(function(el){return el !== elementToRemove});
}
console.log( remove([1, 2, 1, 0, 3, 1, 4], 1) );

This removes all elements from the array and also works faster then combination of slice and indexOf




You can use ES6.

var array=['1','2','3','4','5','6']
var index = array.filter((value)=>value!='3');

Output :

["1", "2", "4", "5", "6"]



You can use lodash _.pull (mutate array), _.pullAt (mutate array) or _.without (does't mutate array),

var array1 = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
_.pull(array1, 'c')
console.log(array1) // ['a', 'b', 'd']

var array2 = ['e', 'f', 'g', 'h']
_.pullAt(array2, 0)
console.log(array2) // ['f', 'g', 'h']

var array3 = ['i', 'j', 'k', 'l']
var newArray = _.without(array3, 'i') // ['j', 'k', 'l']
console.log(array3) // ['i', 'j', 'k', 'l']



I'm pretty new to JavaScript and needed this functionality. I merely wrote this:

function removeFromArray(array, item, index) {
  while((index = array.indexOf(item)) > -1) {
    array.splice(index, 1);
  }
}

Then when I want to use it:

//Set-up some dummy data
var dummyObj = {name:"meow"};
var dummyArray = [dummyObj, "item1", "item1", "item2"];

//Remove the dummy data
removeFromArray(dummyArray, dummyObj);
removeFromArray(dummyArray, "item2");

Output - As expected. ["item1", "item1"]

You may have different needs than I, so you can easily modify it to suit them. I hope this helps someone.




Update: This method is recommended only if you cannot use ECMAScript 2015 (formerly known as ES6). If you can use it, other answers here provide much neater implementations.


This gist here will solve your problem, and also deletes all occurrences of the argument instead of just 1 (or a specified value).

Array.prototype.destroy = function(obj){
    // Return null if no objects were found and removed
    var destroyed = null;

    for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++){

        // Use while-loop to find adjacent equal objects
        while(this[i] === obj){

            // Remove this[i] and store it within destroyed
            destroyed = this.splice(i, 1)[0];
        }
    }

    return destroyed;
}

Usage:

var x = [1, 2, 3, 3, true, false, undefined, false];

x.destroy(3);         // => 3
x.destroy(false);     // => false
x;                    // => [1, 2, true, undefined]

x.destroy(true);      // => true
x.destroy(undefined); // => undefined
x;                    // => [1, 2]

x.destroy(3);         // => null
x;                    // => [1, 2]



You should never mutate your array your array. As this is against functional programming pattern. What you can do is create a new array without referencing the array you want to change data of using es6 method filter;

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6];

Suppose you want to remove 5 from the array you can simply do it like this.

myArray = myArray.filter(value => value !== 5);

This will give you a new array without the value you wanted to remove. So the result will be

 [1,2,3,4,6]; // 5 has been removed from this array

For further understanding you can read the MDN documentation on Array.filter https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/filter




A more modern, ECMAScript 2015 (formerly known as Harmony or ES 6) approach. Given:

const items = [1, 2, 3, 4];
const index = 2;

Then:

items.filter((x, i) => i !== index);

Yielding:

[1, 2, 4]

You can use Babel and a polyfill service to ensure this is well supported across browsers.







Based on all the answers which were mainly correct and taking into account the best practices suggested (especially not using Array.prototype directly), I came up with the below code:

function arrayWithout(arr, values) {
  var isArray = function(canBeArray) {
    if (Array.isArray) {
      return Array.isArray(canBeArray);
    }
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(canBeArray) === '[object Array]';
  };

  var excludedValues = (isArray(values)) ? values : [].slice.call(arguments, 1);
  var arrCopy = arr.slice(0);

  for (var i = arrCopy.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if (excludedValues.indexOf(arrCopy[i]) > -1) {
      arrCopy.splice(i, 1);
    }
  }

  return arrCopy;
}

Reviewing the above function, despite the fact that it works fine, I realised there could be some performance improvement. Also using ES6 instead of ES5 is a much better approach. To that end, this is the improved code:

const arrayWithoutFastest = (() => {
  const isArray = canBeArray => ('isArray' in Array) 
    ? Array.isArray(canBeArray) 
    : Object.prototype.toString.call(canBeArray) === '[object Array]';

  let mapIncludes = (map, key) => map.has(key);
  let objectIncludes = (obj, key) => key in obj;
  let includes;

  function arrayWithoutFastest(arr, ...thisArgs) {
    let withoutValues = isArray(thisArgs[0]) ? thisArgs[0] : thisArgs;

    if (typeof Map !== 'undefined') {
      withoutValues = withoutValues.reduce((map, value) => map.set(value, value), new Map());
      includes = mapIncludes;
    } else {
      withoutValues = withoutValues.reduce((map, value) => { map[value] = value; return map; } , {}); 
      includes = objectIncludes;
    }

    const arrCopy = [];
    const length = arr.length;

    for (let i = 0; i < length; i++) {
      // If value is not in exclude list
      if (!includes(withoutValues, arr[i])) {
        arrCopy.push(arr[i]);
      }
    }

    return arrCopy;
  }

  return arrayWithoutFastest;  
})();

How to use:

const arr = [1,2,3,4,5,"name", false];

arrayWithoutFastest(arr, 1); // will return array [2,3,4,5,"name", false]
arrayWithoutFastest(arr, 'name'); // will return [2,3,4,5, false]
arrayWithoutFastest(arr, false); // will return [2,3,4,5]
arrayWithoutFastest(arr,[1,2]); // will return [3,4,5,"name", false];
arrayWithoutFastest(arr, {bar: "foo"}); // will return the same array (new copy)

I am currently writing a blog post in which I have benchmarked several solutions for Array without problem and compared the time it takes to run. I will update this answer with the link once I finish that post. Just to let you know, I have compared the above against lodash's without and in case the browser supports Map, it beats lodash! Notice that I am not using Array.prototype.indexOf or Array.prototype.includes as wrapping the exlcudeValues in a Map or Object makes querying faster! (https://jsperf.com/array-without-benchmark-against-lodash)




You have 1 to 9 array and you want remove 5 use below code.

var numberArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

var newNumberArray = numberArray.filter(m => {
  return m !== 5;
});

console.log("new Array, 5 removed", newNumberArray);

If you want to multiple value ex :- 1,7,8

var numberArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

var newNumberArray = numberArray.filter(m => {
  return (m !== 1) && (m !== 7) && (m !== 8);
});

console.log("new Array, 5 removed", newNumberArray);

If you want to remove array value in array ex :- [3,4,5]

var numberArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];
var removebleArray = [3,4,5];

var newNumberArray = numberArray.filter(m => {
    return !removebleArray.includes(m);
});

console.log("new Array, [3,4,5] removed", newNumberArray);

includes supported browser is link






Related