How to read a large text file line by line using Java?


Answers

Look at this blog:

The buffer size may be specified, or the default size may be used. The default is large enough for most purposes.

// Open the file
FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream("textfile.txt");
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fstream));

String strLine;

//Read File Line By Line
while ((strLine = br.readLine()) != null)   {
  // Print the content on the console
  System.out.println (strLine);
}

//Close the input stream
br.close();
Question

I need to read a large text file of around 5-6 GB line by line using Java.

How can I do this quickly?




In Java 7:

String folderPath = "C:/folderOfMyFile";
Path path = Paths.get(folderPath, "myFileName.csv"); //or any text file eg.: txt, bat, etc
Charset charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");

try (BufferedReader reader = Files.newBufferedReader(path , charset)) {
  while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null ) {
    //separate all csv fields into string array
    String[] lineVariables = line.split(","); 
  }
} catch (IOException e) {
    System.err.println(e);
}



You can use streams to do it more precisely:

Files.lines(Paths.get("input.txt")).forEach(s -> stringBuffer.append(s);



The clear way to achieve this,

For example:

If you have dataFile.txt on your current directory

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;

public class readByLine
{
    public readByLine() throws FileNotFoundException
    {
        Scanner linReader = new Scanner(new File("dataFile.txt"));

        while (linReader.hasNext())
        {
            String line = linReader.nextLine();
            System.out.println(line);
        }
        linReader.close();

    }

    public static void main(String args[])  throws FileNotFoundException
    {
        new readByLine();
    }
}

The output like as below,




For Reading file with java 8

  package com.java.java8;

    import java.nio.file.Files;
    import java.nio.file.Paths;
    import java.util.stream.Stream;

    /**
     * The Class ReadLargeFile.
     *
     * @author Ankit Sood Apr 20, 2017
     */
    public class ReadLargeFile {

        /**
         * The main method.
         *
         * @param args
         *            the arguments
         */
        public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            Stream<String> stream = Files.lines(Paths.get("C:\\Users\\System\\Desktop\\demoData.txt"));
            stream.forEach(System.out::println);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        }
    }



Here is a sample with full error handling and supporting charset specification for pre-Java 7. With Java 7 you can use try-with-resources syntax, which makes the code cleaner.

If you just want the default charset you can skip the InputStream and use FileReader.

InputStream ins = null; // raw byte-stream
Reader r = null; // cooked reader
BufferedReader br = null; // buffered for readLine()
try {
    String s;
    ins = new FileInputStream("textfile.txt");
    r = new InputStreamReader(ins, "UTF-8"); // leave charset out for default
    br = new BufferedReader(r);
    while ((s = br.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    System.err.println(e.getMessage()); // handle exception
}
finally {
    if (br != null) { try { br.close(); } catch(Throwable t) { /* ensure close happens */ } }
    if (r != null) { try { r.close(); } catch(Throwable t) { /* ensure close happens */ } }
    if (ins != null) { try { ins.close(); } catch(Throwable t) { /* ensure close happens */ } }
}

Here is the Groovy version, with full error handling:

File f = new File("textfile.txt");
f.withReader("UTF-8") { br ->
    br.eachLine { line ->
        println line;
    }
}



What you can do is scan the entire text using Scanner and go through the text line by line. Of course you should import the following:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.util.Scanner;
public static void readText throws FileNotFoundException {
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(new File("samplefilename.txt"));
    while(scan.hasNextLine()){
        String line = scan.nextLine();
        //Here you can manipulate the string the way you want
    }
}

Scanner basically scans all the text. The while loop is used to traverse through the entire text.

The .hasNextLine() function is a boolean that returns true if there are still more lines in the text. The .nextLine() function gives you an entire line as a String which you can then use the way you want. Try System.out.println(line) to print the text.

Side Note: .txt is the file type text.




You can also use apache commons io:

File file = new File("/home/user/file.txt");
try {
    List<String> lines = FileUtils.readLines(file);
} catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}



In Java 8, there is also an alternative to using Files.lines(). If your input source isn't a file but something more abstract like a Reader or an InputStream, you can stream the lines via the BufferedReaders lines() method.

For example:

try( BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader( ... ) ) {
  reader.lines().foreach( line -> processLine( line ) );
}

will call processLine() for each input line read by the BufferedReader.




I usually do the reading routine straightforward:

void readResource(InputStream source) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader stream = null;
    try {
        stream = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(source));
        while (true) {
            String line = stream.readLine();
            if(line == null) {
                break;
            }
            //process line
            System.out.println(line)
        }
    } finally {
        closeQuiet(stream);
    }
}

static void closeQuiet(Closeable closeable) {
    if (closeable != null) {
        try {
            closeable.close();
        } catch (IOException ignore) {
        }
    }
}