javascript - scripts package.json Sending command line arguments to npm script



5 Answers

You asked to be able to run something like npm start 8080. This is possible without needing to modify script.js or configuration files as follows.

For example, in your "scripts" JSON value, include--

"start": "node ./script.js server $PORT"

And then from the command-line:

$ PORT=8080 npm start

I have confirmed that this works using bash and npm 1.4.23. Note that this work-around does not require GitHub npm issue #3494 to be resolved.

npm scripts variables

The scripts portion of my package.json currently looks like this:

"scripts": {
    "start": "node ./script.js server"
}

...which means I can run npm start to start the server. So far so good.

However, I would like to be able to run something like npm start 8080 and have the argument(s) passed to script.js (e.g. npm start 8080 => node ./script.js server 8080). Is this possible?




jakub.g's answer is correct, however an example using grunt seems a bit complex.

So my simpler answer:

- Sending a command line argument to an npm script

Syntax for sending command line arguments to an npm script:

npm run [command] [-- <args>]

Imagine we have an npm start task in our package.json to kick off webpack dev server:

"scripts": {
  "start": "webpack-dev-server --port 5000"
},

We run this from the command line with npm start

Now if we want to pass in a port to the npm script:

"scripts": {
  "start": "webpack-dev-server --port process.env.port || 8080"
},

running this and passing the port e.g. 5000 via command line would be as follows:

npm start --port:5000

- Using package.json config:

As mentioned by jakub.g, you can alternatively set params in the config of your package.json

"config": {
  "myPort": "5000"
}

"scripts": {
  "start": "webpack-dev-server --port process.env.npm_package_config_myPort || 8080"
},

npm start will use the port specified in your config, or alternatively you can override it

npm config set myPackage:myPort 3000

- Setting a param in your npm script

An example of reading a variable set in your npm script. In this example NODE_ENV

"scripts": {
  "start:prod": "NODE_ENV=prod node server.js",
  "start:dev": "NODE_ENV=dev node server.js"
},

read NODE_ENV in server.js either prod or dev

var env = process.env.NODE_ENV || 'prod'

if(env === 'dev'){
    var app = require("./serverDev.js");
} else {
    var app = require("./serverProd.js");
}



Use process.argv in your code then just provide a trailing $* to your scripts value entry.

echoargs.js:

console.log('arguments: ' + process.argv.slice(2));

package.json:

"scripts": {
    "start": "node echoargs.js $*"
}

Examples:

> npm start 1 2 3
arguments: 1,2,3

process.argv[0] is the executable (node), process.argv[1] is your script.

Tested with npm v5.3.0 and node v8.4.0




This doesn't really answer your question but you could always use environment variables instead:

"scripts": {
    "start": "PORT=3000 node server.js"
}

Then in your server.js file:

var port = process.env.PORT || 3000;



I've found this question while I was trying to solve my issue with running sequelize seed:generate cli command:

node_modules/.bin/sequelize seed:generate --name=user

Let me get to the point. I wanted to have a short script command in my package.json file and to provide --name argument at the same time

The answer came after some experiments. Here is my command in package.json

"scripts: {
  "seed:generate":"NODE_ENV=development node_modules/.bin/sequelize seed:generate"
}

... and here is and example of running it in terminal to generate a seed file for a user

> yarn seed:generate --name=user

> npm run seed:generate -- --name=user

FYI

yarn -v
1.6.0

npm -v
5.6.0



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