[c#] Enum “Inheritance”



5 Answers

You can achieve what you want with classes:

public class Base
{
    public const int A = 1;
    public const int B = 2;
    public const int C = 3;
}
public class Consume : Base
{
    public const int D = 4;
    public const int E = 5;
}

Now you can use these classes similar as when they were enums:

int i = Consume.B;

Update (after your update of the question):

If you assign the same int values to the constants as defined in the existing enum, then you can cast between the enum and the constants, e.g:

public enum SomeEnum // this is the existing enum (from WSDL)
{
    A = 1,
    B = 2,
    ...
}
public class Base
{
    public const int A = (int)SomeEnum.A;
    //...
}
public class Consume : Base
{
    public const int D = 4;
    public const int E = 5;
}

// where you have to use the enum, use a cast:
SomeEnum e = (SomeEnum)Consume.B;
Question

I have an enum in a low level namespace. I'd like to provide a class or enum in a mid level namespace that "inherits" the low level enum.

namespace low
{
   public enum base
   {
      x, y, z
   }
}

namespace mid
{
   public enum consume : low.base
   {
   }
}

I'm hoping that this is possible, or perhaps some kind of class that can take the place of the enum consume which will provide a layer of abstraction for the enum, but still let an instance of that class access the enum.

Thoughts?

EDIT: One of the reasons I haven't just switched this to consts in classes is that the low level enum is needed by a service that I must consume. I have been given the WSDLs and the XSDs, which define the structure as an enum. The service cannot be changed.




I know this answer is kind of late but this is what I ended up doing:

public class BaseAnimal : IEquatable<BaseAnimal>
{
    public string Name { private set; get; }
    public int Value { private set; get; }

    public BaseAnimal(int value, String name)
    {
        this.Name = name;
        this.Value = value;
    }

    public override String ToString()
    {
        return Name;
    }

    public bool Equals(BaseAnimal other)
    {
        return other.Name == this.Name && other.Value == this.Value;
    }
}

public class AnimalType : BaseAnimal
{
    public static readonly BaseAnimal Invertebrate = new BaseAnimal(1, "Invertebrate");

    public static readonly BaseAnimal Amphibians = new BaseAnimal(2, "Amphibians");

    // etc        
}

public class DogType : AnimalType
{
    public static readonly BaseAnimal Golden_Retriever = new BaseAnimal(3, "Golden_Retriever");

    public static readonly BaseAnimal Great_Dane = new BaseAnimal(4, "Great_Dane");

    // etc        
}

Then I am able to do things like:

public void SomeMethod()
{
    var a = AnimalType.Amphibians;
    var b = AnimalType.Amphibians;

    if (a == b)
    {
        // should be equal
    }

    // call method as
    Foo(a);

    // using ifs
    if (a == AnimalType.Amphibians)
    {
    }
    else if (a == AnimalType.Invertebrate)
    {
    }
    else if (a == DogType.Golden_Retriever)
    {
    }
    // etc          
}

public void Foo(BaseAnimal typeOfAnimal)
{
}



another possible solution:

public enum @base
{
    x,
    y,
    z
}

public enum consume
{
    x = @base.x,
    y = @base.y,
    z = @base.z,

    a,b,c
}

// TODO: Add a unit-test to check that if @base and consume are aligned

HTH




I also wanted to overload Enums and created a mix of the answer of 'Seven' on this page and the answer of 'Merlyn Morgan-Graham' on a duplicate post of this, plus a couple of improvements.
Main advantages of my solution over the others:

  • automatic increment of the underlying int value
  • automatic naming

This is an out-of-the-box solution and may be directly inserted into your project. It is designed to my needs, so if you don't like some parts of it, just replace them with your own code.

First, there is the base class CEnum that all custom enums should inherit from. It has the basic functionality, similar to the .net Enum type:

public class CEnum
{
  protected static readonly int msc_iUpdateNames  = int.MinValue;
  protected static int          ms_iAutoValue     = -1;
  protected static List<int>    ms_listiValue     = new List<int>();

  public int Value
  {
    get;
    protected set;
  }

  public string Name
  {
    get;
    protected set;
  }

  protected CEnum ()
  {
    CommonConstructor (-1);
  }

  protected CEnum (int i_iValue)
  {
    CommonConstructor (i_iValue);
  }

  public static string[] GetNames (IList<CEnum> i_listoValue)
  {
    if (i_listoValue == null)
      return null;
    string[] asName = new string[i_listoValue.Count];
    for (int ixCnt = 0; ixCnt < asName.Length; ixCnt++)
      asName[ixCnt] = i_listoValue[ixCnt]?.Name;
    return asName;
  }

  public static CEnum[] GetValues ()
  {
    return new CEnum[0];
  }

  protected virtual void CommonConstructor (int i_iValue)
  {
    if (i_iValue == msc_iUpdateNames)
    {
      UpdateNames (this.GetType ());
      return;
    }
    else if (i_iValue > ms_iAutoValue)
      ms_iAutoValue = i_iValue;
    else
      i_iValue = ++ms_iAutoValue;

    if (ms_listiValue.Contains (i_iValue))
      throw new ArgumentException ("duplicate value " + i_iValue.ToString ());
    Value = i_iValue;
    ms_listiValue.Add (i_iValue);
  }

  private static void UpdateNames (Type i_oType)
  {
    if (i_oType == null)
      return;
    FieldInfo[] aoFieldInfo = i_oType.GetFields (BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);

    foreach (FieldInfo oFieldInfo in aoFieldInfo)
    {
      CEnum oEnumResult = oFieldInfo.GetValue (null) as CEnum;
      if (oEnumResult == null)
        continue;
      oEnumResult.Name = oFieldInfo.Name;
    }
  }
}

Secondly, here are 2 derived Enum classes. All derived classes need some basic methods in order to work as expected. It's always the same boilerplate code; I haven't found a way yet to outsource it to the base class. The code of the first level of inheritance differs slightly from all subsequent levels.

public class CEnumResult : CEnum
{
  private   static List<CEnumResult>  ms_listoValue = new List<CEnumResult>();

  public    static readonly CEnumResult Nothing         = new CEnumResult (  0);
  public    static readonly CEnumResult SUCCESS         = new CEnumResult (  1);
  public    static readonly CEnumResult UserAbort       = new CEnumResult ( 11);
  public    static readonly CEnumResult InProgress      = new CEnumResult (101);
  public    static readonly CEnumResult Pausing         = new CEnumResult (201);
  private   static readonly CEnumResult Dummy           = new CEnumResult (msc_iUpdateNames);

  protected CEnumResult () : base ()
  {
  }

  protected CEnumResult (int i_iValue) : base (i_iValue)
  {
  }

  protected override void CommonConstructor (int i_iValue)
  {
    base.CommonConstructor (i_iValue);

    if (i_iValue == msc_iUpdateNames)
      return;
    if (this.GetType () == System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod ().DeclaringType)
      ms_listoValue.Add (this);
  }

  public static new CEnumResult[] GetValues ()
  {
    List<CEnumResult> listoValue = new List<CEnumResult> ();
    listoValue.AddRange (ms_listoValue);
    return listoValue.ToArray ();
  }
}

public class CEnumResultClassCommon : CEnumResult
{
  private   static List<CEnumResultClassCommon> ms_listoValue = new List<CEnumResultClassCommon>();

  public    static readonly CEnumResult Error_InternalProgramming           = new CEnumResultClassCommon (1000);

  public    static readonly CEnumResult Error_Initialization                = new CEnumResultClassCommon ();
  public    static readonly CEnumResult Error_ObjectNotInitialized          = new CEnumResultClassCommon ();
  public    static readonly CEnumResult Error_DLLMissing                    = new CEnumResultClassCommon ();
  // ... many more
  private   static readonly CEnumResult Dummy                               = new CEnumResultClassCommon (msc_iUpdateNames);

  protected CEnumResultClassCommon () : base ()
  {
  }

  protected CEnumResultClassCommon (int i_iValue) : base (i_iValue)
  {
  }

  protected override void CommonConstructor (int i_iValue)
  {
    base.CommonConstructor (i_iValue);

    if (i_iValue == msc_iUpdateNames)
      return;
    if (this.GetType () == System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod ().DeclaringType)
      ms_listoValue.Add (this);
  }

  public static new CEnumResult[] GetValues ()
  {
    List<CEnumResult> listoValue = new List<CEnumResult> (CEnumResult.GetValues ());
    listoValue.AddRange (ms_listoValue);
    return listoValue.ToArray ();
  }
}

The classes have been successfully tested with follwing code:

private static void Main (string[] args)
{
  CEnumResult oEnumResult = CEnumResultClassCommon.Error_Initialization;
  string sName = oEnumResult.Name;   // sName = "Error_Initialization"

  CEnum[] aoEnumResult = CEnumResultClassCommon.GetValues ();   // aoEnumResult = {testCEnumResult.Program.CEnumResult[9]}
  string[] asEnumNames = CEnum.GetNames (aoEnumResult);
  int ixValue = Array.IndexOf (aoEnumResult, oEnumResult);    // ixValue = 6
}



The solutions above using classes with int constants lack type-safety. I.e. you could invent new values actually not defined in the class. Furthermore it is not possible for example to write a method taking one of these classes as input.

You would need to write

public void DoSomethingMeaningFull(int consumeValue) ...

However, there is a class based solution of the old days of Java, when there were no enums available. This provides an almost enum-like behaviour. The only caveat is that these constants cannot be used within a switch-statement.

public class MyBaseEnum
{
    public static readonly MyBaseEnum A = new MyBaseEnum( 1 );
    public static readonly MyBaseEnum B = new MyBaseEnum( 2 );
    public static readonly MyBaseEnum C = new MyBaseEnum( 3 );

    public int InternalValue { get; protected set; }

    protected MyBaseEnum( int internalValue )
    {
        this.InternalValue = internalValue;
    }
}

public class MyEnum : MyBaseEnum
{
    public static readonly MyEnum D = new MyEnum( 4 );
    public static readonly MyEnum E = new MyEnum( 5 );

    protected MyEnum( int internalValue ) : base( internalValue )
    {
        // Nothing
    }
}

[TestMethod]
public void EnumTest()
{
    this.DoSomethingMeaningful( MyEnum.A );
}

private void DoSomethingMeaningful( MyBaseEnum enumValue )
{
    // ...
    if( enumValue == MyEnum.A ) { /* ... */ }
    else if (enumValue == MyEnum.B) { /* ... */ }
    // ...
}



Enums are not actual classes, even if they look like it. Internally, they are treated just like their underlying type (by default Int32). Therefore, you can only do this by "copying" single values from one enum to another and casting them to their integer number to compare them for equality.




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Tags

c# c#   .net .net   enums