[java] Éviter! = Déclarations nulles



Answers

Si vous utilisez (ou envisagez d'utiliser) un IDE Java comme JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA , Eclipse ou Netbeans ou un outil comme findbugs, vous pouvez utiliser des annotations pour résoudre ce problème.

Fondamentalement, vous avez @Nullable et @NotNull .

Vous pouvez utiliser dans la méthode et les paramètres, comme ceci:

@NotNull public static String helloWorld() {
    return "Hello World";
}

ou

@Nullable public static String helloWorld() {
    return "Hello World";
}

Le deuxième exemple ne compilera pas (dans IntelliJ IDEA).

Lorsque vous utilisez la première fonction helloWorld() dans un autre morceau de code:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    String result = helloWorld();
    if(result != null) {
        System.out.println(result);
    }
}

Maintenant, le compilateur IntelliJ IDEA vous dira que la vérification est inutile, puisque la fonction helloWorld() ne retournera pas null , jamais.

En utilisant le paramètre

void someMethod(@NotNull someParameter) { }

si vous écrivez quelque chose comme:

someMethod(null);

Cela ne compilera pas.

Dernier exemple en utilisant @Nullable

@Nullable iWantToDestroyEverything() { return null; }

Ce faisant

iWantToDestroyEverything().something();

Et vous pouvez être sûr que cela n'arrivera pas. :)

C'est une bonne façon de laisser le compilateur vérifier quelque chose de plus que d'habitude et de renforcer vos contrats pour qu'ils soient plus forts. Malheureusement, ce n'est pas supporté par tous les compilateurs.

Dans IntelliJ IDEA 10.5 et plus, ils ont ajouté la prise en charge de toute autre @Nullable @NotNull .

Voir le billet du blog Plus flexible et configurable @ Nullable / @ NotNull annotations .

Question

J'utilise beaucoup object != null pour éviter NullPointerException .

Y a-t-il une bonne alternative à cela?

Par exemple:

if (someobject != null) {
    someobject.doCalc();
}

Cela évite une NullPointerException , quand il est inconnu si l'objet est null ou non.

Notez que la réponse acceptée peut être obsolète, voir https://.com/a/2386013/12943 pour une approche plus récente.




En fonction du type d'objets que vous contrôlez, vous pouvez utiliser certaines des classes dans les communs apache tels que: apache commons lang et apache commons collections

Exemple:

String foo;
...
if( StringUtils.isBlank( foo ) ) {
   ///do something
}

ou (en fonction de ce que vous devez vérifier):

String foo;
...
if( StringUtils.isEmpty( foo ) ) {
   ///do something
}

La classe StringUtils est seulement l'une des nombreuses; il y a pas mal de bonnes classes dans les communs qui ne font aucune manipulation sécuritaire.

Voici un exemple de la façon dont vous pouvez utiliser la validation nulle dans JAVA lorsque vous incluez la bibliothèque apache (commons-lang-2.4.jar)

public DOCUMENT read(String xml, ValidationEventHandler validationEventHandler) {
    Validate.notNull(validationEventHandler,"ValidationHandler not Injected");
    return read(new StringReader(xml), true, validationEventHandler);
}

Et si vous utilisez Spring, Spring a également la même fonctionnalité dans son paquet, voir library (spring-2.4.6.jar)

Exemple sur comment utiliser cette classe statique à partir du printemps (org.springframework.util.Assert)

Assert.notNull(validationEventHandler,"ValidationHandler not Injected");



Java 7 a une nouvelle classe d'utilitaires java.util.Objects sur laquelle il existe une méthode requireNonNull() . Tout ce qu'il fait est de lancer une NullPointerException si son argument est null, mais il nettoie un peu le code. Exemple:

Objects.requireNonNull(someObject);
someObject.doCalc();

La méthode est la plus utile pour checking juste avant une affectation dans un constructeur, où chaque utilisation peut sauver trois lignes de code:

Parent(Child child) {
   if (child == null) {
      throw new NullPointerException("child");
   }
   this.child = child;
}

devient

Parent(Child child) {
   this.child = Objects.requireNonNull(child, "child");
}



Le framework de collections Google offre un moyen efficace et élégant d'effectuer la vérification null.

Il existe une méthode dans une classe de bibliothèque comme celle-ci:

static <T> T checkNotNull(T e) {
   if (e == null) {
      throw new NullPointerException();
   }
   return e;
}

Et l'utilisation est (avec l' import static ):

...
void foo(int a, Person p) {
   if (checkNotNull(p).getAge() > a) {
      ...
   }
   else {
      ...
   }
}
...

Ou dans votre exemple:

checkNotNull(someobject).doCalc();



Just don't ever use null. Don't allow it.

In my classes, most fields and local variables have non-null default values, and I add contract statements (always-on asserts) everywhere in the code to make sure this is being enforced (since it's more succinct, and more expressive than letting it come up as an NPE and then having to resolve the line number, etc.).

Once I adopted this practice, I noticed that the problems seemed to fix themselves. You'd catch things much earlier in the development process just by accident and realize you had a weak spot.. and more importantly.. it helps encapsulate different modules' concerns, different modules can 'trust' each other, and no more littering the code with if = null else constructs!

This is defensive programming and results in much cleaner code in the long run. Always sanitize the data, eg here by enforcing rigid standards, and the problems go away.

class C {
    private final MyType mustBeSet;
    public C(MyType mything) {
       mustBeSet=Contract.notNull(mything);
    }
   private String name = "<unknown>";
   public void setName(String s) {
      name = Contract.notNull(s);
   }
}


class Contract {
    public static <T> T notNull(T t) { if (t == null) { throw new ContractException("argument must be non-null"); return t; }
}

The contracts are like mini-unit tests which are always running, even in production, and when things fail, you know why, rather than a random NPE you have to somehow figure out.




Ultimately, the only way to completely solve this problem is by using a different programming language:

  • In Objective-C, you can do the equivalent of invoking a method on nil , and absolutely nothing will happen. This makes most null checks unnecessary, but it can make errors much harder to diagnose.
  • In Nice , a Java-derived language, there are two versions of all types: a potentially-null version and a not-null version. You can only invoke methods on not-null types. Potentially-null types can be converted to not-null types through explicit checking for null. This makes it much easier to know where null checks are necessary and where they aren't.



I highly disregard answers that suggest using the null objects in every situation. This pattern may break the contract and bury problems deeper and deeper instead of solving them, not mentioning that used inappropriately will create another pile of boilerplate code that will require future maintenance.

In reality if something returned from a method can be null and the calling code has to make decision upon that, there should an earlier call that ensures the state.

Also keep in mind, that null object pattern will be memory hungry if used without care. For this - the instance of a NullObject should be shared between owners, and not be an unigue instance for each of these.

Also I would not recommend using this pattern where the type is meant to be a primitive type representation - like mathematical entities, that are not scalars: vectors, matrices, complex numbers and POD(Plain Old Data) objects, which are meant to hold state in form of Java built-in types. In the latter case you would end up calling getter methods with arbitrary results. For example what should a NullPerson.getName() method return?

It's worth considering such cases in order to avoid absurd results.




Seulement pour cette situation - Éviter de vérifier null avant une comparaison de chaîne:

if ( foo.equals("bar") ) {
 // ...
}

résultera en une NullPointerException si foo n'existe pas.

Vous pouvez éviter cela si vous comparez votre String s comme ceci:

if ( "bar".equals(foo) ) {
 // ...
}



  1. Never initialise variables to null.
  2. If (1) is not possible, initialise all collections and arrays to empty collections/arrays.

Doing this in your own code and you can avoid != null checks.

Most of the time null checks seem to guard loops over collections or arrays, so just initialise them empty, you won't need any null checks.

// Bad
ArrayList<String> lemmings;
String[] names;

void checkLemmings() {
    if (lemmings != null) for(lemming: lemmings) {
        // do something
    }
}



// Good
ArrayList<String> lemmings = new ArrayList<String>();
String[] names = {};

void checkLemmings() {
    for(lemming: lemmings) {
        // do something
    }
}

There is a tiny overhead in this, but it's worth it for cleaner code and less NullPointerExceptions.




This is a very common problem for every Java developer. So there is official support in Java 8 to address these issues without cluttered code.

Java 8 has introduced java.util.Optional<T> . It is a container that may or may not hold a non-null value. Java 8 has given a safer way to handle an object whose value may be null in some of the cases. It is inspired from the ideas of Haskell and Scala .

In a nutshell, the Optional class includes methods to explicitly deal with the cases where a value is present or absent. However, the advantage compared to null references is that the Optional<T> class forces you to think about the case when the value is not present. As a consequence, you can prevent unintended null pointer exceptions.

In above example we have a home service factory that returns a handle to multiple appliances available in the home. But these services may or may not be available/functional; it means it may result in a NullPointerException. Instead of adding a null if condition before using any service, let's wrap it in to Optional<Service>.

WRAPPING TO OPTION<T>

Let's consider a method to get a reference of a service from a factory. Instead of returning the service reference, wrap it with Optional. It lets the API user know that the returned service may or may not available/functional, use defensively

public Optional<Service> getRefrigertorControl() {
      Service s = new  RefrigeratorService();
       //...
      return Optional.ofNullable(s);
   }

As you see Optional.ofNullable() provides an easy way to get the reference wrapped. There are another ways to get the reference of Optional, either Optional.empty() & Optional.of() . One for returning an empty object instead of retuning null and the other to wrap a non-nullable object, respectively.

SO HOW EXACTLY IT HELPS TO AVOID A NULL CHECK?

Once you have wrapped a reference object, Optional provides many useful methods to invoke methods on a wrapped reference without NPE.

Optional ref = homeServices.getRefrigertorControl();
ref.ifPresent(HomeServices::switchItOn);

Optional.ifPresent invokes the given Consumer with a reference if it is a non-null value. Otherwise, it does nothing.

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Consumer<T>

Represents an operation that accepts a single input argument and returns no result. Unlike most other functional interfaces, Consumer is expected to operate via side-effects. It is so clean and easy to understand. In the above code example, HomeService.switchOn(Service) gets invoked if the Optional holding reference is non-null.

We use the ternary operator very often for checking null condition and return an alternative value or default value. Optional provides another way to handle the same condition without checking null. Optional.orElse(defaultObj) returns defaultObj if the Optional has a null value. Let's use this in our sample code:

public static Optional<HomeServices> get() {
    service = Optional.of(service.orElse(new HomeServices()));
    return service;
}

Now HomeServices.get() does same thing, but in a better way. It checks whether the service is already initialized of not. If it is then return the same or create a new New service. Optional<T>.orElse(T) helps to return a default value.

Finally, here is our NPE as well as null check-free code:

import java.util.Optional;
public class HomeServices {
    private static final int NOW = 0;
    private static Optional<HomeServices> service;

public static Optional<HomeServices> get() {
    service = Optional.of(service.orElse(new HomeServices()));
    return service;
}

public Optional<Service> getRefrigertorControl() {
    Service s = new  RefrigeratorService();
    //...
    return Optional.ofNullable(s);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    /* Get Home Services handle */
    Optional<HomeServices> homeServices = HomeServices.get();
    if(homeServices != null) {
        Optional<Service> refrigertorControl = homeServices.get().getRefrigertorControl();
        refrigertorControl.ifPresent(HomeServices::switchItOn);
    }
}

public static void switchItOn(Service s){
         //...
    }
}

The complete post is NPE as well as Null check-free code … Really? .




Wow, je déteste presque ajouter une autre réponse quand nous avons 57 façons différentes de recommander le NullObject pattern , mais je pense que certaines personnes intéressées par cette question aimeraient savoir qu'il existe une proposition sur la table pour Java 7 pour ajouter "null" -safe handling ": syntaxe simplifiée pour la logique if-not-equal-null.

L'exemple donné par Alex Miller ressemble à ceci:

public String getPostcode(Person person) {  
  return person?.getAddress()?.getPostcode();  
}  

Le ?. signifie seulement de-référence l'identificateur de gauche si elle n'est pas nulle, sinon évaluer le reste de l'expression comme null . Certaines personnes, comme le membre de Dick Posse Dick Wall et les électeurs de Devoxx, adorent cette proposition, mais il y a aussi de l'opposition, au motif qu'elle encouragera en fait l'utilisation de null comme valeur sentinelle.

Mise à jour: Une proposed pour un opérateur à sécurité nulle dans Java 7 a été soumise sous Project Coin. La syntaxe est un peu différente de l'exemple ci-dessus, mais c'est la même notion.

Mise à jour: La proposition d'opérateur null-safe ne l'a pas fait dans Project Coin. Donc, vous ne verrez pas cette syntaxe dans Java 7.




I've tried the NullObjectPattern but for me is not always the best way to go. There are sometimes when a "no action" is not appropiate.

NullPointerException is a Runtime exception that means it's developers fault and with enough experience it tells you exactly where is the error.

Now to the answer:

Try to make all your attributes and its accessors as private as possible or avoid to expose them to the clients at all. You can have the argument values in the constructor of course, but by reducing the scope you don't let the client class pass an invalid value. If you need to modify the values, you can always create a new object . You check the values in the constructor only once and in the rest of the methods you can be almost sure that the values are not null.

Of course, experience is the better way to understand and apply this suggestion.

Byte!




Je suis fan du code "fail fast". Demandez-vous: faites-vous quelque chose d'utile dans le cas où le paramètre est nul? Si vous n'avez pas de réponse claire à ce que votre code devrait faire dans ce cas ... Autrement dit, il ne devrait jamais être nul en premier lieu, puis l'ignorer et autoriser une exception NullPointerException. Le code appelant aura autant de sens pour un NPE que pour une exception IllegalArgumentException, mais il sera plus facile pour le développeur de déboguer et de comprendre ce qui s'est passé si un NPE est lancé plutôt que votre code essayant d'exécuter une autre éventualité inattendue logique - ce qui entraîne finalement l'échec de l'application de toute façon.




Asking that question points out that you may be interested in error handling strategies. Your team's architect should decide how to work errors. There are several ways to do this:

  1. allow the Exceptions to ripple through - catch them at the 'main loop' or in some other managing routine.

    • check for error conditions and handle them appropriately

Sure do have a look at Aspect Oriented Programming, too - they have neat ways to insert if( o == null ) handleNull() into your bytecode.




public static <T> T ifNull(T toCheck, T ifNull) {
    if (toCheck == null) {
           return ifNull;
    }
    return toCheck;
}



Related