[java] Избегание! = Null



Answers

Если вы используете (или планируете использовать) Java IDE, например JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA , Eclipse или Netbeans или инструмент, например findbugs, вы можете использовать аннотации для решения этой проблемы.

В принципе, у вас есть @Nullable и @NotNull .

Вы можете использовать в методе и параметрах, например:

@NotNull public static String helloWorld() {
    return "Hello World";
}

или

@Nullable public static String helloWorld() {
    return "Hello World";
}

Второй пример не будет компилироваться (в IntelliJ IDEA).

Когда вы используете первую функцию helloWorld() в другом фрагменте кода:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    String result = helloWorld();
    if(result != null) {
        System.out.println(result);
    }
}

Теперь компилятор IntelliJ IDEA скажет вам, что проверка бесполезна, так как функция helloWorld() не вернет значение null .

Использование параметра

void someMethod(@NotNull someParameter) { }

если вы напишете что-то вроде:

someMethod(null);

Это не скомпилируется.

Последний пример с использованием @Nullable

@Nullable iWantToDestroyEverything() { return null; }

Делая это

iWantToDestroyEverything().something();

И вы можете быть уверены, что этого не произойдет. :)

Это хороший способ позволить компилятору проверить что-то большее, чем обычно, и усилить ваши контракты. К сожалению, он не поддерживается всеми компиляторами.

В IntelliJ IDEA 10.5 и далее они добавили поддержку любых других реализаций @Nullable @NotNull .

См. Запись в блоге. Более гибкие и настраиваемые @ Nullable / @ NotNull аннотации .

Question

Я использую object != null чтобы избежать NullPointerException .

Есть ли хорошая альтернатива этому?

Например:

if (someobject != null) {
    someobject.doCalc();
}

Это позволяет избежать NullPointerException , когда неизвестно, является ли объект null или нет.

Обратите внимание, что принятый ответ может быть устаревшим, см. https://.com/a/2386013/12943 для более позднего подхода.




Рамка коллекций Google предлагает хороший и элегантный способ достижения нулевой проверки.

В библиотечном классе есть метод:

static <T> T checkNotNull(T e) {
   if (e == null) {
      throw new NullPointerException();
   }
   return e;
}

И использование (с import static ):

...
void foo(int a, Person p) {
   if (checkNotNull(p).getAge() > a) {
      ...
   }
   else {
      ...
   }
}
...

Или в вашем примере:

checkNotNull(someobject).doCalc();



public static <T> T ifNull(T toCheck, T ifNull) {
    if (toCheck == null) {
           return ifNull;
    }
    return toCheck;
}



Только для этой ситуации. Избегайте проверки нуля до сравнения строки:

if ( foo.equals("bar") ) {
 // ...
}

приведет к NullPointerException если foo не существует.

Вы можете избежать этого, если сравнить String s следующим образом:

if ( "bar".equals(foo) ) {
 // ...
}



Java 7 имеет новый класс утилиты java.util.Objects для которого существует метод requireNonNull() . Все это делает throw NullPointerException если его аргумент равен null, но он немного очищает код. Пример:

Objects.requireNonNull(someObject);
someObject.doCalc();

Этот метод наиболее полезен для checking непосредственно перед назначением в конструкторе, где каждое его использование может сохранять три строки кода:

Parent(Child child) {
   if (child == null) {
      throw new NullPointerException("child");
   }
   this.child = child;
}

становится

Parent(Child child) {
   this.child = Objects.requireNonNull(child, "child");
}



This is a very common problem for every Java developer. So there is official support in Java 8 to address these issues without cluttered code.

Java 8 has introduced java.util.Optional<T> . It is a container that may or may not hold a non-null value. Java 8 has given a safer way to handle an object whose value may be null in some of the cases. It is inspired from the ideas of Haskell and Scala .

In a nutshell, the Optional class includes methods to explicitly deal with the cases where a value is present or absent. However, the advantage compared to null references is that the Optional<T> class forces you to think about the case when the value is not present. As a consequence, you can prevent unintended null pointer exceptions.

In above example we have a home service factory that returns a handle to multiple appliances available in the home. But these services may or may not be available/functional; it means it may result in a NullPointerException. Instead of adding a null if condition before using any service, let's wrap it in to Optional<Service>.

WRAPPING TO OPTION<T>

Let's consider a method to get a reference of a service from a factory. Instead of returning the service reference, wrap it with Optional. It lets the API user know that the returned service may or may not available/functional, use defensively

public Optional<Service> getRefrigertorControl() {
      Service s = new  RefrigeratorService();
       //...
      return Optional.ofNullable(s);
   }

As you see Optional.ofNullable() provides an easy way to get the reference wrapped. There are another ways to get the reference of Optional, either Optional.empty() & Optional.of() . One for returning an empty object instead of retuning null and the other to wrap a non-nullable object, respectively.

SO HOW EXACTLY IT HELPS TO AVOID A NULL CHECK?

Once you have wrapped a reference object, Optional provides many useful methods to invoke methods on a wrapped reference without NPE.

Optional ref = homeServices.getRefrigertorControl();
ref.ifPresent(HomeServices::switchItOn);

Optional.ifPresent invokes the given Consumer with a reference if it is a non-null value. Otherwise, it does nothing.

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Consumer<T>

Represents an operation that accepts a single input argument and returns no result. Unlike most other functional interfaces, Consumer is expected to operate via side-effects. It is so clean and easy to understand. In the above code example, HomeService.switchOn(Service) gets invoked if the Optional holding reference is non-null.

We use the ternary operator very often for checking null condition and return an alternative value or default value. Optional provides another way to handle the same condition without checking null. Optional.orElse(defaultObj) returns defaultObj if the Optional has a null value. Let's use this in our sample code:

public static Optional<HomeServices> get() {
    service = Optional.of(service.orElse(new HomeServices()));
    return service;
}

Now HomeServices.get() does same thing, but in a better way. It checks whether the service is already initialized of not. If it is then return the same or create a new New service. Optional<T>.orElse(T) helps to return a default value.

Finally, here is our NPE as well as null check-free code:

import java.util.Optional;
public class HomeServices {
    private static final int NOW = 0;
    private static Optional<HomeServices> service;

public static Optional<HomeServices> get() {
    service = Optional.of(service.orElse(new HomeServices()));
    return service;
}

public Optional<Service> getRefrigertorControl() {
    Service s = new  RefrigeratorService();
    //...
    return Optional.ofNullable(s);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    /* Get Home Services handle */
    Optional<HomeServices> homeServices = HomeServices.get();
    if(homeServices != null) {
        Optional<Service> refrigertorControl = homeServices.get().getRefrigertorControl();
        refrigertorControl.ifPresent(HomeServices::switchItOn);
    }
}

public static void switchItOn(Service s){
         //...
    }
}

The complete post is NPE as well as Null check-free code … Really? ,




I highly disregard answers that suggest using the null objects in every situation. This pattern may break the contract and bury problems deeper and deeper instead of solving them, not mentioning that used inappropriately will create another pile of boilerplate code that will require future maintenance.

In reality if something returned from a method can be null and the calling code has to make decision upon that, there should an earlier call that ensures the state.

Also keep in mind, that null object pattern will be memory hungry if used without care. For this - the instance of a NullObject should be shared between owners, and not be an unigue instance for each of these.

Also I would not recommend using this pattern where the type is meant to be a primitive type representation - like mathematical entities, that are not scalars: vectors, matrices, complex numbers and POD(Plain Old Data) objects, which are meant to hold state in form of Java built-in types. In the latter case you would end up calling getter methods with arbitrary results. For example what should a NullPerson.getName() method return?

It's worth considering such cases in order to avoid absurd results.




Вау, я почти не хочу добавлять еще один ответ, когда у нас есть 57 различных способов рекомендовать NullObject pattern , но я думаю, что некоторым людям, заинтересованным в этом вопросе, может понравиться знать, что в таблице для Java 7 есть предложение добавить «null -safe handling " - упрощенное синтаксис для логики if-not-equal-null.

Пример, данный Алексом Миллером, выглядит следующим образом:

public String getPostcode(Person person) {  
  return person?.getAddress()?.getPostcode();  
}  

?. означает только отмену ссылки на левый идентификатор, если он не является нулевым, иначе оценивайте остальную часть выражения как null . Некоторые люди, такие как член Джона Поссе Дик Уолл и избиратели из Devoxx, действительно любят это предложение, но есть и оппозиция, потому что это на самом деле будет способствовать более широкому использованию null в качестве дозорной ценности.

Обновление: proposed для оператора с нулевой безопасностью в Java 7 было представлено в Project Coin. Синтаксис немного отличается от приведенного выше примера, но это одно и то же понятие.

Обновление. Предложение с нулевым безопасным оператором не попало в проектную монету. Таким образом, вы не увидите этот синтаксис в Java 7.




I've tried the NullObjectPattern but for me is not always the best way to go. There are sometimes when a "no action" is not appropiate.

NullPointerException is a Runtime exception that means it's developers fault and with enough experience it tells you exactly where is the error.

Now to the answer:

Try to make all your attributes and its accessors as private as possible or avoid to expose them to the clients at all. You can have the argument values in the constructor of course, but by reducing the scope you don't let the client class pass an invalid value. If you need to modify the values, you can always create a new object . You check the values in the constructor only once and in the rest of the methods you can be almost sure that the values are not null.

Of course, experience is the better way to understand and apply this suggestion.

Byte!




Just don't ever use null. Don't allow it.

In my classes, most fields and local variables have non-null default values, and I add contract statements (always-on asserts) everywhere in the code to make sure this is being enforced (since it's more succinct, and more expressive than letting it come up as an NPE and then having to resolve the line number, etc.).

Once I adopted this practice, I noticed that the problems seemed to fix themselves. You'd catch things much earlier in the development process just by accident and realize you had a weak spot.. and more importantly.. it helps encapsulate different modules' concerns, different modules can 'trust' each other, and no more littering the code with if = null else constructs!

This is defensive programming and results in much cleaner code in the long run. Always sanitize the data, eg here by enforcing rigid standards, and the problems go away.

class C {
    private final MyType mustBeSet;
    public C(MyType mything) {
       mustBeSet=Contract.notNull(mything);
    }
   private String name = "<unknown>";
   public void setName(String s) {
      name = Contract.notNull(s);
   }
}


class Contract {
    public static <T> T notNull(T t) { if (t == null) { throw new ContractException("argument must be non-null"); return t; }
}

The contracts are like mini-unit tests which are always running, even in production, and when things fail, you know why, rather than a random NPE you have to somehow figure out.




В зависимости от того, какие объекты вы проверяете, вы можете использовать некоторые из классов в сообществах apache, таких как: apache commons lang и коллекции коллекций apache

Пример:

String foo;
...
if( StringUtils.isBlank( foo ) ) {
   ///do something
}

или (в зависимости от того, что вам нужно проверить):

String foo;
...
if( StringUtils.isEmpty( foo ) ) {
   ///do something
}

Класс StringUtils является лишь одним из многих; есть довольно много хороших классов в достояниях, которые делают нулевую безопасную манипуляцию.

Ниже приведен пример того, как вы можете использовать null vallidation в JAVA, когда вы включаете библиотеку apache (commons-lang-2.4.jar)

public DOCUMENT read(String xml, ValidationEventHandler validationEventHandler) {
    Validate.notNull(validationEventHandler,"ValidationHandler not Injected");
    return read(new StringReader(xml), true, validationEventHandler);
}

И если вы используете Spring, Spring также имеет одинаковую функциональность в своем пакете, см. Библиотеку (spring-2.4.6.jar)

Пример использования этого static classf из Spring (org.springframework.util.Assert)

Assert.notNull(validationEventHandler,"ValidationHandler not Injected");



  1. Never initialise variables to null.
  2. If (1) is not possible, initialise all collections and arrays to empty collections/arrays.

Doing this in your own code and you can avoid != null checks.

Most of the time null checks seem to guard loops over collections or arrays, so just initialise them empty, you won't need any null checks.

// Bad
ArrayList<String> lemmings;
String[] names;

void checkLemmings() {
    if (lemmings != null) for(lemming: lemmings) {
        // do something
    }
}



// Good
ArrayList<String> lemmings = new ArrayList<String>();
String[] names = {};

void checkLemmings() {
    for(lemming: lemmings) {
        // do something
    }
}

There is a tiny overhead in this, but it's worth it for cleaner code and less NullPointerExceptions.




Asking that question points out that you may be interested in error handling strategies. Your team's architect should decide how to work errors. There are several ways to do this:

  1. allow the Exceptions to ripple through - catch them at the 'main loop' or in some other managing routine.

    • check for error conditions and handle them appropriately

Sure do have a look at Aspect Oriented Programming, too - they have neat ways to insert if( o == null ) handleNull() into your bytecode.




Я поклонник кода «fail fast». Спросите себя: вы делаете что-то полезное в случае, когда параметр равен нулю? Если у вас нет четкого ответа на то, что должен делать ваш код в этом случае ... То есть он никогда не должен быть нулевым, а затем игнорировать его и разрешать бросать NullPointerException. Вызывающий код будет иметь такое же значение NPE, как и исключение IllegalArgumentException, но разработчику будет легче отлаживать и понимать, что пошло не так, если NPE выбрано, а не ваш код, пытающийся выполнить некоторые другие непредвиденные непредвиденные обстоятельства логики, что в конечном итоге приводит к тому, что приложение все равно не работает.




Ultimately, the only way to completely solve this problem is by using a different programming language:

  • In Objective-C, you can do the equivalent of invoking a method on nil , and absolutely nothing will happen. This makes most null checks unnecessary, but it can make errors much harder to diagnose.
  • In Nice , a Java-derived language, there are two versions of all types: a potentially-null version and a not-null version. You can only invoke methods on not-null types. Potentially-null types can be converted to not-null types through explicit checking for null. This makes it much easier to know where null checks are necessary and where they aren't.



Related