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Is it possible to import modules from all files in a directory, using a wildcard? (8)

With ES6, I can import several exports from a file like this:

import {ThingA, ThingB, ThingC} from 'lib/things';

However, I like the organization of having one module per file. I end up with imports like this:

import ThingA from 'lib/things/ThingA';
import ThingB from 'lib/things/ThingB';
import ThingC from 'lib/things/ThingC';

I would love to be able to do this:

import {ThingA, ThingB, ThingC} from 'lib/things/*';

or something similar, with the understood convention that each file contains one default export, and each module is named the same as its file.

Is this possible?


Great gugly muglys! This was harder than it needed to be.

Export one flat default

This is a great opportunity to use spread ( ... in { ...Matters, ...Contacts } below:

// imports/collections/Matters.js
export default {           // default export
  hello: 'World',
  something: 'important',
};
// imports/collections/Contacts.js
export default {           // default export
  hello: 'Moon',
  email: '[email protected]',
};
// imports/collections/index.js
import Matters from './Matters';      // import default export as var 'Matters'
import Contacts from './Contacts';

export default {  // default export
  ...Matters,     // spread Matters, overwriting previous properties
  ...Contacts,    // spread Contacts, overwriting previosu properties
};
// imports/test.js
import collections from './collections';  // import default export as 'collections'

console.log(collections);

Then, to run babel compiled code from the command line (from project root /):

$ npm install --save-dev @babel/core @babel/cli @babel/preset-env @babel/node 
(trimmed)

$ npx babel-node --presets @babel/preset-env imports/test.js 
{ hello: 'Moon',
  something: 'important',
  email: '[email protected]' }

Export one tree-like default

If you'd prefer to not overwrite properties, change:

// imports/collections/index.js
import Matters from './Matters';     // import default as 'Matters'
import Contacts from './Contacts';

export default {   // export default
  Matters,
  Contacts,
};

And the output will be:

$ npx babel-node --presets @babel/preset-env imports/test.js
{ Matters: { hello: 'World', something: 'important' },
  Contacts: { hello: 'Moon', email: '[email protected]' } }

Export multiple named exports w/ no default

If you're dedicated to DRY , the syntax on the imports changes as well:

// imports/collections/index.js

// export default as named export 'Matters'
export { default as Matters } from './Matters';  
export { default as Contacts } from './Contacts'; 

This creates 2 named exports w/ no default export. Then change:

// imports/test.js
import { Matters, Contacts } from './collections';

console.log(Matters, Contacts);

And the output:

$ npx babel-node --presets @babel/preset-env imports/test.js
{ hello: 'World', something: 'important' } { hello: 'Moon', email: '[email protected]' }

Import all named exports

// imports/collections/index.js

// export default as named export 'Matters'
export { default as Matters } from './Matters';
export { default as Contacts } from './Contacts';
// imports/test.js

// Import all named exports as 'collections'
import * as collections from './collections';

console.log(collections);  // interesting output
console.log(collections.Matters, collections.Contacts);

Notice the destructuring import { Matters, Contacts } from './collections'; in the previous example.

$ npx babel-node --presets @babel/preset-env imports/test.js
{ Matters: [Getter], Contacts: [Getter] }
{ hello: 'World', something: 'important' } { hello: 'Moon', email: '[email protected]' }

In practice

Given these source files:

/myLib/thingA.js
/myLib/thingB.js
/myLib/thingC.js

Creating a /myLib/index.js to bundle up all the files defeats the purpose of import/export. It would be easier to make everything global in the first place, than to make everything global via import/export via index.js "wrapper files".

If you want a particular file, import thingA from './myLib/thingA'; in your own projects.

Creating a "wrapper file" with exports for the module only makes sense if you're packaging for npm or on a multi-year multi-team project.

Made it this far? See the docs for more details.

Also, yay for finally supporting three `s as code fence markup.


I don't think this is possible, but afaik the resolution of module names is up to module loaders so there might a loader implementation that does support this.

Until then, you could use an intermediate "module file" at lib/things/index.js that just contains

export * from 'ThingA';
export * from 'ThingB';
export * from 'ThingC';

and it would allow you to do

import {ThingA, ThingB, ThingC} from 'lib/things';

Just a variation on the theme already provided in the answer, but how about this:

In a Thing ,

export default function ThingA () {}

In things/index.js ,

export {default as ThingA} from './ThingA'
export {default as ThingB} from './ThingB'
export {default as ThingC} from './ThingC'

Then to consume all the things elsewhere,

import * as things from './things'
things.ThingA()

Or to consume just some of things,

import {ThingA,ThingB} from './things'

Just an other approach to @Bergi's answer

// lib/things/index.js
import ThingA from './ThingA';
import ThingB from './ThingB';
import ThingC from './ThingC';

export default {
 ThingA,
 ThingB,
 ThingC
}

Uses

import {ThingA, ThingB, ThingC} from './lib/things';

The current answers suggest a workaround but it's bugged me why this doesn't exist, so I've created a babel plugin which does this.

Install it using:

npm i --save-dev babel-plugin-wildcard

then add it to your .babelrc with:

{
    "plugins": ["wildcard"]
}

see the repo for detailed install info

This allows you to do this:

import * as Things from './lib/things';

// Do whatever you want with these :D
Things.ThingA;
Things.ThingB;
Things.ThingC;

again, the repo contains further information on what exactly it does, but doing it this way avoids creating index.js files and also happens at compile-time to avoid doing readdir s at runtime.

Also with a newer version you can do exactly like your example:

 import { ThingsA, ThingsB, ThingsC } from './lib/things/*';

works the same as the above.


This is not exactly what you asked for but, with this method I can Iterate throught componentsList in my other files and use function such as componentsList.map(...) which I find pretty usefull !

import StepOne from './StepOne';
import StepTwo from './StepTwo';
import StepThree from './StepThree';
import StepFour from './StepFour';
import StepFive from './StepFive';
import StepSix from './StepSix';
import StepSeven from './StepSeven';
import StepEight from './StepEight';

const componentsList= () => [
  { component: StepOne(), key: 'step1' },
  { component: StepTwo(), key: 'step2' },
  { component: StepThree(), key: 'step3' },
  { component: StepFour(), key: 'step4' },
  { component: StepFive(), key: 'step5' },
  { component: StepSix(), key: 'step6' },
  { component: StepSeven(), key: 'step7' },
  { component: StepEight(), key: 'step8' }
];

export default componentsList;

You can use require as well:

const moduleHolder = []

function loadModules(path) {
  let stat = fs.lstatSync(path)
  if (stat.isDirectory()) {
    // we have a directory: do a tree walk
    const files = fs.readdirSync(path)
    let f,
      l = files.length
    for (var i = 0; i < l; i++) {
      f = pathModule.join(path, files[i])
      loadModules(f)
    }
  } else {
    // we have a file: load it
    var controller = require(path)
    moduleHolder.push(controller)
  }
}

Then use your moduleHolder with dynamically loaded controllers:

  loadModules(DIR) 
  for (const controller of moduleHolder) {
    controller(app, db)
  }

if you don't export default in A, B, C but just export {} then it's possible to do so

// things/A.js
export function A() {}

// things/B.js
export function B() {}

// things/C.js
export function C() {}

// foo.js
import * as Foo from ./thing
Foo.A()
Foo.B()
Foo.C()






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