c# code - How do I remedy the “The breakpoint will not currently be hit.No symbols have been loaded for this document.” warning?




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C# desktop application on express edition. Worked then didn't work 5 seconds later.

I tried the following.

  • Ensure debug configuration, debug flag, and full debug info are set on all assemblies.
  • Delete all bin and obj folders and all DLLs related to the project from my entire machine.
  • Recreate projects causing the problem from scratch.
  • Reboot.

I have two WinForms projects in the solution. One of them loads the debug info, one doesn't. They both refer to the assembly I'm trying to get debug info on in exactly the same way in the project file. Any ideas?


I want to add in here, mostly for myself when I come back to review this question, that symbols are not loaded until the assembly is loaded, and the assembly is not loaded until it is needed. If the breakpoint is in a library that is only used in one function in your main assembly, the symbols will not be loaded (and it will show the breakpoint as not being hit) until that function is called.


Answers

For an ASP.Net application, check the properties of the site, ASP.NET tab. Ensure that the correct ASP.NET version is selected.


Just something simple to try - you may have tried it already. Right click the Solution in solution explorer, click "clean solution", this deletes all the compiled and temporary files associated with a solution.

Do a rebuild of the solution and try to debug again.

I've also had troubles with breakpoints multiple projects in a solution - some compiled as x86, some as x64.


Try running visual studio as an administrator within windows.


Debug > Windows > Modules to see what modules were being loaded put me in the right direction.

In my case IIS Express seemed to be loading a different DLL from the temporary ASP.NET files.

The solution?

  1. Browse to C:\Users\<YOUR USER>\AppData\Local\Temp\Temporary ASP.NET Files\vs
  2. Delete everything in this directory!

I was able to fix the error by simply setting the option in the 'Attach to Process' to 'Automatically determine the type of code to debug' option as shown in the attached screenshot.

Simply follow the steps below:

  • Go to Debug from the menu bar
  • Click on Attach to Process
  • Near the Attach to option, click on the Select button
  • The Select Code Type window will appear
  • Now select the option Automatically determine the type of code to debug and click the OK button.


In my case i am trying to debug in relase mode. Once i change it to debug mode. Its working


You need to enable "Generate debug info" in compiler settings


I also had the same issue what I rebuild the whole solution (including refereced projects) in x86( or x64)

Even though I set all of my projects to x86 from Configuration Manager (Build->ConfigManager) some of my projects werent set to x86.

So Just to make sure right click on project->properties->Debug Tab, verify Configuration and Platform.


I tried everything mentioned above, but nothing worked. [Clean solution, and check for PDB files etc.]

Even publishing the same solution did not resolve the issue.

Then I went to back to what I usually do to resolve (fool this stubborn Visual Studio)

All I did was to make a deliberate change in code and publish the solution. Then I reverted the change and published again.

Voila [PDB files rid of evil spirits].. Not a smart resolution, but this did work.. :-|


This took me a while tried other options above and for some strange reason debugging stopped working.

Tool->Options->Debugging->General->(untick)"Require source files to exactly match the original version"


None of those answers solved my problem. I tried another thing based on fact that the project with the stop wasn't in reality the loaded project. I found as Hans Passant wrote that the .dll where I want to stop debugger and the associoated .pdb files where copied near the .exe file. Those files have had an older date so I thought they wasn't updated in the runtime. I manually deleted them, Visual Studio create another pair AND put this new pair near the .exe. Now the breakpoins works !

Maybe Visual Studio cannot copy and REPLACE existing files (.dll and .pdb) near the .exe since there are another there. So if I deleted manually then VS could create new one near .exe.

I think that another changes (checks and so on - from the another answers) triggered something and Visual Studio copied and replaced the dll and pdb from the project folder to the folder near the exe, so that was a solution.

I think that the root cause of the problem is that the Visual Studio use another file in runtime, no the file from the project, with the stop.

Maybe this answer to help someone !


Just Check whether your solution is in Release Mode.


Cross posting this fix from Hans K that I found on the similar thread >> HERE <<:

Right click on solution --> Properties

Look under Common Properties --> Startup Project

Select multiple startup projects

select Start action on the projects you need to debug.


Project Properties (then select your build config) > Build Tab > Advanced... > Debug Info (dropdown)

Set to 'all' or 'pdb-only' then rebuild


Option "Start debugging, Debug + Windows + Modules" does not exist in Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013 edition.

Unchecking "Use Managed Compatibility Mode" in Tools Options Debugging fixes this.


Start debugging, as soon as you've arrived at a breakpoint or used Debug > Break All, use Debug > Windows > Modules. You'll see a list of all the assemblies that are loaded into the process. Locate the one you want to get debug info for. Right-click it and select Symbol Load Information. You'll get a dialog that lists all the directories where it looked for the .pdb file for the assembly. Verify that list against the actual .pdb location. Make sure it doesn't find an old one.

In normal projects, the assembly and its .pdb file should always have been copied by the IDE into the same folder as your .exe. The bin\Debug folder of your project. Make sure you remove one from the GAC if you've been playing with it.


Webapplications (IIS Express) only:

  • Rightclick IIS Express Tray and close the IIS.
  • Clean Solution


I have read carefully all the answers above, but none of them solved my problem.

In my case, I was compiling a class library (DLL). No modules seem to be loaded in Debug -> Modules, so I couldn't even load the symbols manually.

My solution was to add this line to my code:

System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Launch();

Once this code is reached, an exception is triggered and .NET Framework shows a dialog box asking which Visual Studio (i.e. new instance of VS 2008, new instance of VS 2013, etc) you want to use to debug the program. You can choose the existing instance of VS with your project loaded. This will attach the process to your VS session and load all symbols, and now you can debug your project.

Of course, the compilation has to be done using the Debug configuration, not Release.


In my case "Optimize Code" was checked in my project properties. This caused VS to see my assembly as "not my code", and in turn, it did not load symbols for it.

The solution was to uncheck this.


We found the cause of our problem. This code was using the "CodeBehind" attribute in the Page directive of the .aspx file instead of the "CodeFile" attribute (ASP.NET 2.0 and beyond). After days of desperation, a simple search and replace solved the problem.


I know I'm years late, but I thought I'd done something wrong and followed the above steps then I realised I'd set the solution configuration to 'Release' by mistake :)


The selected answer led me to fix my problem. But I need to do a few things more:

Even with "Debug" selected in the dropdown:

And in the project Properties > Build:

The Visual Studio was not loading symbols to a specific project. So in that dropdown I select "Configuration Manager" and saw that the settings to my web project was incorrect:

Then I set that to "Debug" and it started to generate the .pdb file. BUT I need to manually copy the PDB and DLL and put in the folder that VS was looking (here is where the selected answer helped me):


Sometimes, even though it gives you this error, the breakpoint still gets hit, so just ignore the error. This happens fairly often in the Views of an MVC web app.


Instead of doing all these things just

Close and reopen

the solution it will fix the issue


Adding the following section in the nunit-x86.exe.config worked for me:

  <startup>
      <supportedRuntime version="v4.0" sku=".NETFramework,Version=v4.0,Profile=Client"/>
  </startup>

The 'sku' section is only needed when running with .NET 4's Client Profile. Note that a previous answer showed using 'requiredRuntime' which is obsolete.





c# .net visual-studio debugging breakpoints