javascript - write - npm fs




Writing files in Node.js (8)

I've been trying to find a way to write to a file when using Node.js, but with no success. How can I do that?


Synchronous Write

fs.writeFileSync(file, data[, options])

fs = require('fs');

fs.writeFileSync("synchronous.txt", "synchronous write!")

Asynchronous Write

fs.writeFile(file, data[, options], callback)

fs = require('fs');

fs.writeFile('asynchronous.txt', 'asynchronous write!', (err) => {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log('The file has been saved!');
});

Where

file <string> | <Buffer> | <URL> | <integer> filename or file descriptor
data <string> | <Buffer> | <Uint8Array>
options <Object> | <string>
callback <Function>

Worth reading the offical File System (fs) docs.


Currently there are three ways to write a file:

  1. fs.write(fd, buffer, offset, length, position, callback)

    You need to wait for the callback to ensure that the buffer is written to disk. It's not buffered.

  2. fs.writeFile(filename, data, [encoding], callback)

    All data must be stored at the same time; you cannot perform sequential writes.

  3. fs.createWriteStream(path, [options])

    Creates a WriteStream, which is convenient because you don't need to wait for a callback. But again, it's not buffered.

A WriteStream, as the name says, is a stream. A stream by definition is “a buffer” containing data which moves in one direction (source ► destination). But a writable stream is not necessarily “buffered”. A stream is “buffered” when you write n times, and at time n+1, the stream sends the buffer to the kernel (because it's full and needs to be flushed).

In other words: “A buffer” is the object. Whether or not it “is buffered” is a property of that object.

If you look at the code, the WriteStream inherits from a writable Stream object. If you pay attention, you’ll see how they flush the content; they don't have any buffering system.

If you write a string, it’s converted to a buffer, and then sent to the native layer and written to disk. When writing strings, they're not filling up any buffer. So, if you do:

write("a")
write("b")
write("c")

You're doing:

fs.write(new Buffer("a"))
fs.write(new Buffer("b"))
fs.write(new Buffer("c"))

That’s three calls to the I/O layer. Although you're using “buffers”, the data is not buffered. A buffered stream would do: fs.write(new Buffer ("abc")), one call to the I/O layer.

As of now, in Node.js v0.12 (stable version announced 02/06/2015) now supports two functions: cork() and uncork(). It seems that these functions will finally allow you to buffer/flush the write calls.

For example, in Java there are some classes that provide buffered streams (BufferedOutputStream, BufferedWriter...). If you write three bytes, these bytes will be stored in the buffer (memory) instead of doing an I/O call just for three bytes. When the buffer is full the content is flushed and saved to disk. This improves performance.

I'm not discovering anything, just remembering how a disk access should be done.


Here we use w+ for read/write both actions and if the file path is not found the it would be created automatically.

fs.open(path, 'w+', function(err, data) {
    if (err) {
        console.log("ERROR !! " + err);
    } else {
        fs.write(data, 'content', 0, 'content length', null, function(err) {
            if (err)
                console.log("ERROR !! " + err);
            fs.close(data, function() {
                console.log('written success');
            })
        });
    }
});

Content means what you have to write to the file and its length, 'content.length'.


I know the question asked about "write" but in a more general sense "append" might be useful in some cases as it is easy to use in a loop to add text to a file (whether the file exists or not). Use a "\n" if you want to add lines eg:

var fs = require('fs');
for (var i=0; i<10; i++){
    fs.appendFileSync("junk.csv", "Line:"+i+"\n");
}

There are a lot of details in the filesystem API. The most common way (as far as I know) is:

const fs = require('fs');
fs.writeFile("/tmp/test", "Hey there!", function(err) {
    if(err) {
        return console.log(err);
    }

    console.log("The file was saved!");
}); 

You can of course make it a little more advanced. Non-blocking, writing bits and pieces, not writing the whole file at once:

var fs = require('fs');
var stream = fs.createWriteStream("my_file.txt");
stream.once('open', function(fd) {
  stream.write("My first row\n");
  stream.write("My second row\n");
  stream.end();
});

You may write to a file using fs (file system) module.

Here is an example of how you may do it:

const fs = require('fs');

const writeToFile = (fileName, callback) => {
  fs.open(fileName, 'wx', (error, fileDescriptor) => {
    if (!error && fileDescriptor) {
      // Do something with the file here ...
      fs.writeFile(fileDescriptor, newData, (error) => {
        if (!error) {
          fs.close(fileDescriptor, (error) => {
            if (!error) {
              callback(false);
            } else {
              callback('Error closing the file');
            }
          });
        } else {
          callback('Error writing to new file');
        }
      });
    } else {
      callback('Could not create new file, it may already exists');
    }
  });
};

You might also want to get rid of this callback-inside-callback code structure by useing Promises and async/await statements. This will make asynchronous code structure much more flat. For doing that there is a handy util.promisify(original) function might be utilized. It allows us to switch from callbacks to promises. Take a look at the example with fs functions below:

// Dependencies.
const util = require('util');
const fs = require('fs');

// Promisify "error-back" functions.
const fsOpen = util.promisify(fs.open);
const fsWrite = util.promisify(fs.writeFile);
const fsClose = util.promisify(fs.close);

// Now we may create 'async' function with 'await's.
async function doSomethingWithFile(fileName) {
  const fileDescriptor = await fsOpen(fileName, 'wx');
  
  // Do something with the file here...
  
  await fsWrite(fileDescriptor, newData);
  await fsClose(fileDescriptor);
}

 var fs = require('fs');
 fs.writeFile(path + "\\message.txt", "Hello", function(err){
 if (err) throw err;
  console.log("success");
}); 

For example : read file and write to another file :

  var fs = require('fs');
    var path = process.cwd();
    fs.readFile(path+"\\from.txt",function(err,data)
                {
                    if(err)
                        console.log(err)
                    else
                        {
                            fs.writeFile(path+"\\to.text",function(erro){
                                if(erro)
                                    console.log("error : "+erro);
                                else
                                    console.log("success");
                            });
                        }
                });






fs