places - math.round c#




How to round to nearest even integer? (3)

My last goal is always to round to the nearest even integer.

For example, the number 1122.5196 I want as result 1122. I have tried this options:

Math.Round(1122.5196d, 0, MidpointRounding.ToEven);       // result 1123
Math.Round(1122.5196d, 0, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero); // result 1123

At the end, what I would like to get it is always the nearest even intenger. For example:

  • 1122.51 --> 1122
  • 1122.9 --> 1122 (because the nearest int is 1123 but it is odd, and 1122 is nearer than 1124)
  • 1123.0 --> 1124 (the next even value, the next higher even value)

I only work with positive numbers.

And so on.

There are some method that do that or I should to implement my own method?


Here is an example function i found on msdn,that will only produce even nearest numbers seems to fit your case well ,

using System;
class Example
{
public static void Main()
{
  // Define a set of Decimal values.
  decimal[] values = { 1.45m, 1.55m, 123.456789m, 123.456789m, 
                       123.456789m, -123.456m, 
                       new Decimal(1230000000, 0, 0, true, 7 ),
                       new Decimal(1230000000, 0, 0, true, 7 ), 
                       -9999999999.9999999999m, 
                       -9999999999.9999999999m };
  // Define a set of integers to for decimals argument.
  int[] decimals = { 1, 1, 4, 6, 8, 0, 3, 11, 9, 10};

  Console.WriteLine("{0,26}{1,8}{2,26}", 
                    "Argument", "Digits", "Result" );
  Console.WriteLine("{0,26}{1,8}{2,26}", 
                    "--------", "------", "------" );
  for (int ctr = 0; ctr < values.Length; ctr++)
    Console.WriteLine("{0,26}{1,8}{2,26}", 
                      values[ctr], decimals[ctr], 
                      Decimal.Round(values[ctr], decimals[ctr]));
  }
}

// The example displays the following output:
//                   Argument  Digits                    Result
//                   --------  ------                    ------
//                       1.45       1                       1.4
//                       1.55       1                       1.6
//                 123.456789       4                  123.4568
//                 123.456789       6                123.456789
//                 123.456789       8                123.456789
//                   -123.456       0                      -123
//               -123.0000000       3                  -123.000
 //               -123.0000000      11              -123.0000000
//     -9999999999.9999999999       9    -10000000000.000000000
 //     -9999999999.9999999999      10    -9999999999.9999999999

"When rounding midpoint values, the rounding algorithm performs an equality test. Because of problems of binary representation and precision in the floating-point format, the value returned by the method can be unexpected."


One liner:

double RoundToNearestEven(double value) =>
    Math.Truncate(value) + Math.Truncate(value) % 2;

Fiddle

Explanation: if we have an even number with some digits after floating point, we need to just get rid of those digits. If we have an odd number, we need to do the same and then move to the next integer that is guaranteed to be even.

P.S. Thanks to @DmitryBychenko for pointing out that casting double to long is not the brightest idea.


Try this (let's use Math.Round with MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero in order to obtain "next even value" but scaled - 2 factor):

double source = 1123.0;

// 1124.0
double result = Math.Round(source / 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) * 2;

Demo:

double[] tests = new double[] {
     1.0,
  1123.1,
  1123.0,
  1122.9,
  1122.1,
  1122.0,
  1121.5,
  1121.0,
};

string report = string.Join(Environment.NewLine, tests
  .Select(item => $"{item,6:F1} -> {Math.Round(item / 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) * 2}"));

Console.Write(report);

Outcome:

   1.0 -> 2     // In case of tie, next even value
1123.1 -> 1124
1123.0 -> 1124  // In case of tie, next even value
1122.9 -> 1122
1122.1 -> 1122
1122.0 -> 1122
1121.5 -> 1122
1121.0 -> 1122  // In case of tie, next even value




rounding