now - javascript timestamp to date




How do you get a timestamp in JavaScript? (20)

How can I get a timestamp in JavaScript?

Something similar to Unix's timestamp, that is, a single number that represents the current time and date. Either as a number or a string.


Short & Snazzy:

+ new Date()

A unary operator like plus triggers the valueOf method in the Date object and it returns the timestamp (without any alteration).

Details:

On almost all current browsers you can use Date.now() to get the UTC timestamp in milliseconds; a notable exception to this is IE8 and earlier (see compatibility table).

You can easily make a shim for this, though:

if (!Date.now) {
    Date.now = function() { return new Date().getTime(); }
}

To get the timestamp in seconds, you can use:

Math.floor(Date.now() / 1000)

Or alternatively you could use:

Date.now() / 1000 | 0

Which should be slightly faster, but also less readable (also see this answer).

I would recommend using Date.now() (with compatibility shim). It's slightly better because it's shorter & doesn't create a new Date object. However, if you don't want a shim & maximum compatibility, you could use the "old" method to get the timestamp in milliseconds:

new Date().getTime()

Which you can then convert to seconds like this:

Math.round(new Date().getTime()/1000)

And you can also use the valueOf method which we showed above:

new Date().valueOf()

Timestamp in Milliseconds

var timeStampInMs = window.performance && window.performance.now && window.performance.timing && window.performance.timing.navigationStart ? window.performance.now() + window.performance.timing.navigationStart : Date.now();

console.log(timeStampInMs, Date.now());

// The Current Unix Timestamp
// 1443534720 seconds since Jan 01 1970. (UTC)

// seconds
console.log(Math.floor(new Date().valueOf() / 1000)); // 1443534720
console.log(Math.floor(Date.now() / 1000)); // 1443534720
console.log(Math.floor(new Date().getTime() / 1000)); // 1443534720

// milliseconds
console.log(Math.floor(new Date().valueOf())); // 1443534720087
console.log(Math.floor(Date.now())); // 1443534720087
console.log(Math.floor(new Date().getTime())); // 1443534720087

// jQuery
// seconds
console.log(Math.floor($.now() / 1000)); // 1443534720
// milliseconds
console.log($.now()); // 1443534720087
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>



Date native object in JavaScript is the way we get all data about time.

Just be careful in JavaScript the timestamp is depends on the client computer setting, so it's not 100% accurate timestamp. For getting the best result, you need to get the timestamp from the server-side.

Anyway, my preferred way is using vanilla. This is a common way of doing it in JavaScript:

Date.now(); //return 1495255666921

In MDN it's mentioned as below:

The Date.now() method returns the number of milliseconds elapsed since 1 January 1970 00:00:00 UTC.
Because now() is a static method of Date, you always use it as Date.now().

If you using a version below ES5, Date.now(); not works and you need to use:

new Date().getTime();

Any browsers not supported Date.now, you can use this for get current date time:

currentTime = Date.now() || +new Date()

For lodash and underscore users, use _.now.

var timestamp = _.now(); // in milliseconds

For a timestamp with microsecond resolution, there's performance.now:

function time() { 
  return performance.now() + performance.timing.navigationStart;
}

This could for example yield 1436140826653.139, while Date.now only gives 1436140826653.


I highly recommend using moment.js. To get the number of milliseconds since UNIX epoch, do

moment().valueOf()

To get the number of seconds since UNIX epoch, do

moment().unix()

You can also convert times like so:

moment('2015-07-12 14:59:23', 'YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss').valueOf()

I do that all the time. No pun intended.

To use moment.js in the browser:

<script src="moment.js"></script>
<script>
    moment().valueOf();
</script>

For more details, including other ways of installing and using MomentJS, see their docs


I learned a really cool way of converting a given Date object to a Unix timestamp from the source code of JQuery Cookie the other day.

Here's an example:

var date = new Date();
var timestamp = +date;

If want a basic way to generate a timestamp in Node.js this works well.

var time = process.hrtime();
var timestamp = Math.round( time[ 0 ] * 1e3 + time[ 1 ] / 1e6 );

Our team is using this to bust cache in a localhost environment. The output is /dist/css/global.css?v=245521377 where 245521377 is the timestamp generated by hrtime().

Hopefully this helps, the methods above can work as well but I found this to be the simplest approach for our needs in Node.js.


In addition to the other options, if you want a dateformat ISO, you get can get it directly

console.log(new Date().toISOString());

Just to add up, here's a function to return a timestamp string in Javascript. Example: 15:06:38 PM

function displayTime() {
    var str = "";

    var currentTime = new Date()
    var hours = currentTime.getHours()
    var minutes = currentTime.getMinutes()
    var seconds = currentTime.getSeconds()

    if (minutes < 10) {
        minutes = "0" + minutes
    }
    if (seconds < 10) {
        seconds = "0" + seconds
    }
    str += hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds + " ";
    if(hours > 11){
        str += "PM"
    } else {
        str += "AM"
    }
    return str;
}

One I haven't seen yet

Math.floor(Date.now() / 1000); // current time in seconds

Another one I haven't seen yet is

var _ = require('lodash'); // from here https://lodash.com/docs#now
_.now();

The code Math.floor(new Date().getTime() / 1000) can be shortened to new Date / 1E3 | 0.

Consider to skip direct getTime() invocation and use | 0 as a replacement for Math.floor() function. It's also good to remember 1E3 is a shorter equivalent for 1000 (uppercase E is preferred than lowercase to indicate 1E3 as a constant).

As a result you get the following:

var ts = new Date / 1E3 | 0;

console.log(ts);

This one has a solution : which converts unixtime stamp to tim in js try this

var a = new Date(UNIX_timestamp*1000);
var hour = a.getUTCHours();
var min = a.getUTCMinutes();
var sec = a.getUTCSeconds();

Today - 2018.06.27 I provide some time comparison for pure js solutions. This can be useful for people who wanna get/measure time in JS in light/efficient way (eg. for real-time applications like simulations, games etc.)

Tested on MacOs High Sierra 10.13.3 on Chrome 67.0.3396.99 (64-bit), Safari 11.0.3 (13604.5.6), Firefox 59.0.2 (64-bit). On below screenshot I show you results for fastest browser (Safari):

As I observe the Date.now() was fastest method to get timestamp for all three browsers. Safari has 19.2M operations per second, Firefox 16.1M, Chrome 7.8M.

The new Date()*1 was slowest for Chrome (2.8M) and Firefox (2.6M). The Number(new Date()) was slowest for Safari (2.9M).

So the winner JS code is Date.now() and fastest browser is Safari (2x faster that chrome! ).

You can perform test on your machine here: https://jsperf.com/timestamp-test-x.


You can only use

    var timestamp = new Date().getTime();
    console.log(timestamp);

to get the current timestamp. No need to do anything extra.


sometime I need it in objects for xmlhttp calls, so I do like this.

timestamp : parseInt(new Date().getTime()/1000, 10)

var time = Date.now || function() {
  return +new Date;
};

time();




unix-timestamp