without - copy data from one list to another c# linq




How do I clone a generic list in C#? (16)

After a slight modification you can also clone:

public static T DeepClone<T>(T obj)
{
    T objResult;
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
        bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
        ms.Position = 0;
        objResult = (T)bf.Deserialize(ms);
    }
    return objResult;
}

I have a generic list of objects in C#, and wish to clone the list. The items within the list are cloneable, but there doesn't seem to be an option to do list.Clone().

Is there an easy way around this?


Another thing: you could use reflection. If you'll cache this properly, then it'll clone 1,000,000 objects in 5.6 seconds (sadly, 16.4 seconds with inner objects).

[ProtoContract(ImplicitFields = ImplicitFields.AllPublic)]
public class Person
{
       ...
      Job JobDescription
       ...
}

[ProtoContract(ImplicitFields = ImplicitFields.AllPublic)]
public class Job
{...
}

private static readonly Type stringType = typeof (string);

public static class CopyFactory
{
    static readonly Dictionary<Type, PropertyInfo[]> ProperyList = new Dictionary<Type, PropertyInfo[]>();

    private static readonly MethodInfo CreateCopyReflectionMethod;

    static CopyFactory()
    {
        CreateCopyReflectionMethod = typeof(CopyFactory).GetMethod("CreateCopyReflection", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public);
    }

    public static T CreateCopyReflection<T>(T source) where T : new()
    {
        var copyInstance = new T();
        var sourceType = typeof(T);

        PropertyInfo[] propList;
        if (ProperyList.ContainsKey(sourceType))
            propList = ProperyList[sourceType];
        else
        {
            propList = sourceType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
            ProperyList.Add(sourceType, propList);
        }

        foreach (var prop in propList)
        {
            var value = prop.GetValue(source, null);
            prop.SetValue(copyInstance,
                value != null && prop.PropertyType.IsClass && prop.PropertyType != stringType ? CreateCopyReflectionMethod.MakeGenericMethod(prop.PropertyType).Invoke(null, new object[] { value }) : value, null);
        }

        return copyInstance;
    }

I measured it in a simple way, by using the Watcher class.

 var person = new Person
 {
     ...
 };

 for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
 {
    personList.Add(person);
 }
 var watcher = new Stopwatch();
 watcher.Start();
 var copylist = personList.Select(CopyFactory.CreateCopyReflection).ToList();
 watcher.Stop();
 var elapsed = watcher.Elapsed;

RESULT: With inner object PersonInstance - 16.4, PersonInstance = null - 5.6

CopyFactory is just my test class where I have dozen of tests including usage of expression. You could implement this in another form in an extension or whatever. Don't forget about caching.

I didn't test serializing yet, but I doubt in an improvement with a million classes. I'll try something fast protobuf/newton.

P.S.: for the sake of reading simplicity, I only used auto-property here. I could update with FieldInfo, or you should easily implement this by your own.

I recently tested the Protocol Buffers serializer with the DeepClone function out of the box. It wins with 4.2 seconds on a million simple objects, but when it comes to inner objects, it wins with the result 7.4 seconds.

Serializer.DeepClone(personList);

SUMMARY: If you don't have access to the classes, then this will help. Otherwise it depends on the count of the objects. I think you could use reflection up to 10,000 objects (maybe a bit less), but for more than this the Protocol Buffers serializer will perform better.


I use automapper to copy an object. I just setup a mapping that maps one object to itself. You can wrap this operation any way you like.

http://automapper.codeplex.com/


I've made for my own some extension which converts ICollection of items that not implement IClonable

static class CollectionExtensions
{
    public static ICollection<T> Clone<T>(this ICollection<T> listToClone)
    {
        var array = new T[listToClone.Count];
        listToClone.CopyTo(array,0);
        return array.ToList();
    }
}

If you need a cloned list with the same capacity, you can try this:

public static List<T> Clone<T>(this List<T> oldList)
{
    var newList = new List<T>(oldList.Capacity);
    newList.AddRange(oldList);
    return newList;
}

If you only care about value types...

And you know the type:

List<int> newList = new List<int>(oldList);

If you don't know the type before, you'll need a helper function:

List<T> Clone<T>(IEnumerable<T> oldList)
{
    return newList = new List<T>(oldList);
}

The just:

List<string> myNewList = Clone(myOldList);

My friend Gregor Martinovic and I came up with this easy solution using a JavaScript Serializer. There is no need to flag classes as Serializable and in our tests using the Newtonsoft JsonSerializer even faster than using BinaryFormatter. With extension methods usable on every object.

Standard .NET JavascriptSerializer option:

public static T DeepCopy<T>(this T value)
{
    JavaScriptSerializer js = new JavaScriptSerializer();

    string json = js.Serialize(value);

    return js.Deserialize<T>(json);
}

Faster option using Newtonsoft JSON:

public static T DeepCopy<T>(this T value)
{
    string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(value);

    return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(json);
}

The following code should transfer onto a list with minimal changes.

Basically it works by inserting a new random number from a greater range with each successive loop. If there exist numbers already that are the same or higher than it, shift those random numbers up one so they transfer into the new larger range of random indexes.

// Example Usage
int[] indexes = getRandomUniqueIndexArray(selectFrom.Length, toSet.Length);

for(int i = 0; i < toSet.Length; i++)
    toSet[i] = selectFrom[indexes[i]];


private int[] getRandomUniqueIndexArray(int length, int count)
{
    if(count > length || count < 1 || length < 1)
        return new int[0];

    int[] toReturn = new int[count];
    if(count == length)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < toReturn.Length; i++) toReturn[i] = i;
        return toReturn;
    }

    Random r = new Random();
    int startPos = count - 1;
    for(int i = startPos; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        int index = r.Next(length - i);
        for(int j = startPos; j > i; j--)
            if(toReturn[j] >= index)
                toReturn[j]++;
        toReturn[i] = index;
    }

    return toReturn;
}

To clone a list just call .ToList()

Microsoft (R) Roslyn C# Compiler version 2.3.2.62116
Loading context from 'CSharpInteractive.rsp'.
Type "#help" for more information.
> var x = new List<int>() { 3, 4 };
> var y = x.ToList();
> x.Add(5)
> x
List<int>(3) { 3, 4, 5 }
> y
List<int>(2) { 3, 4 }
> 

Unless you need an actual clone of every single object inside your List<T>, the best way to clone a list is to create a new list with the old list as the collection parameter.

List<T> myList = ...;
List<T> cloneOfMyList = new List<T>(myList);

Changes to myList such as insert or remove will not affect cloneOfMyList and vice versa.

The actual objects the two Lists contain are still the same however.


You can use an extension method.

static class Extensions
{
    public static IList<T> Clone<T>(this IList<T> listToClone) where T: ICloneable
    {
        return listToClone.Select(item => (T)item.Clone()).ToList();
    }
}

You can use extension method:

namespace extension
{
    public class ext
    {
        public static List<double> clone(this List<double> t)
        {
            List<double> kop = new List<double>();
            int x;
            for (x = 0; x < t.Count; x++)
            {
                kop.Add(t[x]);
            }
            return kop;
        }
   };

}

You can clone all objects by using their value type members for example, consider this class:

public class matrix
{
    public List<List<double>> mat;
    public int rows,cols;
    public matrix clone()
    { 
        // create new object
        matrix copy = new matrix();
        // firstly I can directly copy rows and cols because they are value types
        copy.rows = this.rows;  
        copy.cols = this.cols;
        // but now I can no t directly copy mat because it is not value type so
        int x;
        // I assume I have clone method for List<double>
        for(x=0;x<this.mat.count;x++)
        {
            copy.mat.Add(this.mat[x].clone());
        }
        // then mat is cloned
        return copy; // and copy of original is returned 
    }
};

Note: if you do any change on copy (or clone) it will not affect the original object.


    public List<TEntity> Clone<TEntity>(List<TEntity> o1List) where TEntity : class , new()
    {
        List<TEntity> retList = new List<TEntity>();
        try
        {
            Type sourceType = typeof(TEntity);
            foreach(var o1 in o1List)
            {
                TEntity o2 = new TEntity();
                foreach (PropertyInfo propInfo in (sourceType.GetProperties()))
                {
                    var val = propInfo.GetValue(o1, null);
                    propInfo.SetValue(o2, val);
                }
                retList.Add(o2);
            }
            return retList;
        }
        catch
        {
            return retList;
        }
    }

 //try this
 List<string> ListCopy= new List<string>(OldList);
 //or try
 List<T> ListCopy=OldList.ToList();

public static Object CloneType(Object objtype)
{
    Object lstfinal = new Object();

    using (MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        BinaryFormatter binaryFormatter = new BinaryFormatter(null, new StreamingContext(StreamingContextStates.Clone));
        binaryFormatter.Serialize(memStream, objtype); memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        lstfinal = binaryFormatter.Deserialize(memStream);
    }

    return lstfinal;
}

public static object DeepClone(object obj) 
{
  object objResult = null;
  using (MemoryStream  ms = new MemoryStream())
  {
    BinaryFormatter  bf =   new BinaryFormatter();
    bf.Serialize(ms, obj);

    ms.Position = 0;
    objResult = bf.Deserialize(ms);
  }
  return objResult;
}

This is one way to do it with C# and .NET 2.0. Your object requires to be [Serializable()]. The goal is to lose all references and build new ones.





clone