java integer - How do I convert a String to an int in Java?




15 Answers

String myString = "1234";
int foo = Integer.parseInt(myString);

See the Java Documentation for more information.

python c#

How can I convert a String to an int in Java?

My String contains only numbers, and I want to return the number it represents.

For example, given the string "1234" the result should be the number 1234.




Well, a very important point to consider is that the Integer parser throws NumberFormatException as stated in Javadoc.

int foo;
String StringThatCouldBeANumberOrNot = "26263Hello"; //will throw exception
String StringThatCouldBeANumberOrNot2 = "26263"; //will not throw exception
try {
      foo = Integer.parseInt(StringThatCouldBeANumberOrNot);
} catch (NumberFormatException e) {
      //Will Throw exception!
      //do something! anything to handle the exception.
}

try {
      foo = Integer.parseInt(StringThatCouldBeANumberOrNot2);
} catch (NumberFormatException e) {
      //No problem this time, but still it is good practice to care about exceptions.
      //Never trust user input :)
      //Do something! Anything to handle the exception.
}

It is important to handle this exception when trying to get integer values from split arguments or dynamically parsing something.




Currently I'm doing an assignment for college, where I can't use certain expressions, such as the ones above, and by looking at the ASCII table, I managed to do it. It's a far more complex code, but it could help others that are restricted like I was.

The first thing to do is to receive the input, in this case, a string of digits; I'll call it String number, and in this case, I'll exemplify it using the number 12, therefore String number = "12";

Another limitation was the fact that I couldn't use repetitive cycles, therefore, a for cycle (which would have been perfect) can't be used either. This limits us a bit, but then again, that's the goal. Since I only needed two digits (taking the last two digits), a simple charAtsolved it:

 // Obtaining the integer values of the char 1 and 2 in ASCII
 int semilastdigitASCII = number.charAt(number.length()-2);
 int lastdigitASCII = number.charAt(number.length()-1);

Having the codes, we just need to look up at the table, and make the necessary adjustments:

 double semilastdigit = semilastdigitASCII - 48;  //A quick look, and -48 is the key
 double lastdigit = lastdigitASCII - 48;

Now, why double? Well, because of a really "weird" step. Currently we have two doubles, 1 and 2, but we need to turn it into 12, there isn't any mathematic operation that we can do.

We're dividing the latter (lastdigit) by 10 in the fashion 2/10 = 0.2 (hence why double) like this:

 lastdigit = lastdigit/10;

This is merely playing with numbers. We were turning the last digit into a decimal. But now, look at what happens:

 double jointdigits = semilastdigit + lastdigit; // 1.0 + 0.2 = 1.2

Without getting too into the math, we're simply isolating units the digits of a number. You see, since we only consider 0-9, dividing by a multiple of 10 is like creating a "box" where you store it (think back at when your first grade teacher explained you what a unit and a hundred were). So:

 int finalnumber = (int) (jointdigits*10); // Be sure to use parentheses "()"

And there you go. You turned a String of digits (in this case, two digits), into an integer composed of those two digits, considering the following limitations:

  • No repetitive cycles
  • No "Magic" Expressions such as parseInt



Integer.decode

You can also use public static Integer decode(String nm) throws NumberFormatException.

It also works for base 8 and 16:

// base 10
Integer.parseInt("12");     // 12 - int
Integer.valueOf("12");      // 12 - Integer
Integer.decode("12");       // 12 - Integer
// base 8
// 10 (0,1,...,7,10,11,12)
Integer.parseInt("12", 8);  // 10 - int
Integer.valueOf("12", 8);   // 10 - Integer
Integer.decode("012");      // 10 - Integer
// base 16
// 18 (0,1,...,F,10,11,12)
Integer.parseInt("12",16);  // 18 - int
Integer.valueOf("12",16);   // 18 - Integer
Integer.decode("#12");      // 18 - Integer
Integer.decode("0x12");     // 18 - Integer
Integer.decode("0X12");     // 18 - Integer
// base 2
Integer.parseInt("11",2);   // 3 - int
Integer.valueOf("11",2);    // 3 - Integer

If you want to get int instead of Integer you can use:

  1. Unboxing:

    int val = Integer.decode("12"); 
    
  2. intValue():

    Integer.decode("12").intValue();
    



Converting a string to an int is more complicated than just convertig a number. You have think about the following issues:

  • Does the string only contains numbers 0-9?
  • What's up with -/+ before or after the string? Is that possible (referring to accounting numbers)?
  • What's up with MAX_-/MIN_INFINITY? What will happen if the string is 99999999999999999999? Can the machine treat this string as an int?



Methods to do that:

 1. Integer.parseInt(s)
 2. Integer.parseInt(s, radix)
 3. Integer.parseInt(s, beginIndex, endIndex, radix)
 4. Integer.parseUnsignedInt(s)
 5. Integer.parseUnsignedInt(s, radix)
 6. Integer.parseUnsignedInt(s, beginIndex, endIndex, radix)
 7. Integer.valueOf(s)
 8. Integer.valueOf(s, radix)
 9. Integer.decode(s)
 10. NumberUtils.toInt(s)
 11. NumberUtils.toInt(s, defaultValue)

Integer.valueOf produces Integer object, all other methods - primitive int.

Last 2 methods from commons-lang3 and big article about converting here.




I'm have a solution, but I do not know how effective it is. But it works well, and I think you could improve it. On the other hand, I did a couple of tests with JUnit which step correctly. I attached the function and testing:

static public Integer str2Int(String str) {
    Integer result = null;
    if (null == str || 0 == str.length()) {
        return null;
    }
    try {
        result = Integer.parseInt(str);
    } 
    catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        String negativeMode = "";
        if(str.indexOf('-') != -1)
            negativeMode = "-";
        str = str.replaceAll("-", "" );
        if (str.indexOf('.') != -1) {
            str = str.substring(0, str.indexOf('.'));
            if (str.length() == 0) {
                return (Integer)0;
            }
        }
        String strNum = str.replaceAll("[^\\d]", "" );
        if (0 == strNum.length()) {
            return null;
        }
        result = Integer.parseInt(negativeMode + strNum);
    }
    return result;
}

Testing with JUnit:

@Test
public void testStr2Int() {
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)(-5), Helper.str2Int("-5"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)50, Helper.str2Int("50.00"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)20, Helper.str2Int("$ 20.90"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)5, Helper.str2Int(" 5.321"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)1000, Helper.str2Int("1,000.50"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)0, Helper.str2Int("0.50"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)0, Helper.str2Int(".50"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)0, Helper.str2Int("-.10"));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)Integer.MAX_VALUE, Helper.str2Int(""+Integer.MAX_VALUE));
    assertEquals("is numeric", (Integer)Integer.MIN_VALUE, Helper.str2Int(""+Integer.MIN_VALUE));
    assertEquals("Not
     is numeric", null, Helper.str2Int("czv.,xcvsa"));
    /**
     * Dynamic test
     */
    for(Integer num = 0; num < 1000; num++) {
        for(int spaces = 1; spaces < 6; spaces++) {
            String numStr = String.format("%0"+spaces+"d", num);
            Integer numNeg = num * -1;
            assertEquals(numStr + ": is numeric", num, Helper.str2Int(numStr));
            assertEquals(numNeg + ": is numeric", numNeg, Helper.str2Int("- " + numStr));
        }
    }
}



Guava has tryParse(String), which returns null if the string couldn't be parsed, for example:

Integer fooInt = Ints.tryParse(fooString);
if (fooInt != null) {
  ...
}



Apart from these above answers, I would like to add several functions:

    public static int parseIntOrDefault(String value, int defaultValue) {
    int result = defaultValue;
    try {
      result = Integer.parseInt(value);
    } catch (Exception e) {

    }
    return result;
  }

  public static int parseIntOrDefault(String value, int beginIndex, int defaultValue) {
    int result = defaultValue;
    try {
      String stringValue = value.substring(beginIndex);
      result = Integer.parseInt(stringValue);
    } catch (Exception e) {

    }
    return result;
  }

  public static int parseIntOrDefault(String value, int beginIndex, int endIndex, int defaultValue) {
    int result = defaultValue;
    try {
      String stringValue = value.substring(beginIndex, endIndex);
      result = Integer.parseInt(stringValue);
    } catch (Exception e) {

    }
    return result;
  }

And here are results while you running them:

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(parseIntOrDefault("123", 0)); // 123
    System.out.println(parseIntOrDefault("aaa", 0)); // 0
    System.out.println(parseIntOrDefault("aaa456", 3, 0)); // 456
    System.out.println(parseIntOrDefault("aaa789bbb", 3, 6, 0)); // 789
  }



In programming competitions, where you're assured that number will always be a valid integer, then you can write your own method to parse input. This will skip all validation related code (since you don't need any of that) and will be a bit more efficient.

  1. For valid positive integer:

    private static int parseInt(String str) {
        int i, n = 0;
    
        for (i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
            n *= 10;
            n += str.charAt(i) - 48;
        }
        return n;
    }
    
  2. For both positive and negative integers:

    private static int parseInt(String str) {
        int i=0, n=0, sign=1;
        if(str.charAt(0) == '-') {
            i=1;
            sign=-1;
        }
        for(; i<str.length(); i++) {
            n*=10;
            n+=str.charAt(i)-48;
        }
        return sign*n;
    }
    

     

  3. If you are expecting a whitespace before or after these numbers, then make sure to do a str = str.trim() before processing further.




As mentioned Apache Commons NumberUtils can do it. Which return 0 if it cannot convert string to int.

You can also define your own default value.

NumberUtils.toInt(String str, int defaultValue)

example:

NumberUtils.toInt("3244", 1) = 3244
NumberUtils.toInt("", 1)     = 1
NumberUtils.toInt(null, 5)   = 5
NumberUtils.toInt("Hi", 6)   = 6
NumberUtils.toInt(" 32 ", 1) = 1 //space in numbers are not allowed
NumberUtils.toInt(StringUtils.trimToEmpty( "  32 ",1)) = 32; 



For normal string you can use:

int number = Integer.parseInt("1234");

For String builder and String buffer you can use:

Integer.parseInt(myBuilderOrBuffer.toString());



Here we go

String str="1234";
int number = Integer.parseInt(str);
print number;//1234



One method is parseInt(String) returns a primitive int

String number = "10";
int result = Integer.parseInt(number);
System.out.println(result);

Second method is valueOf(String) returns a new Integer() object.

String number = "10";
Integer result = Integer.valueOf(number);
System.out.println(result);



This is Complete program with all conditions positive, negative without using library

import java.util.Scanner;


    public class StringToInt {
     public static void main(String args[]) {
      String inputString;
      Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in);
      inputString = s.nextLine();

      if (!inputString.matches("([+-]?([0-9]*[.])?[0-9]+)")) {
       System.out.println("Not a Number");
      } else {
       Double result2 = getNumber(inputString);
       System.out.println("result = " + result2);
      }

     }
     public static Double getNumber(String number) {
      Double result = 0.0;
      Double beforeDecimal = 0.0;
      Double afterDecimal = 0.0;
      Double afterDecimalCount = 0.0;
      int signBit = 1;
      boolean flag = false;

      int count = number.length();
      if (number.charAt(0) == '-') {
       signBit = -1;
       flag = true;
      } else if (number.charAt(0) == '+') {
       flag = true;
      }
      for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
       if (flag && i == 0) {
        continue;

       }
       if (afterDecimalCount == 0.0) {
        if (number.charAt(i) - '.' == 0) {
         afterDecimalCount++;
        } else {
         beforeDecimal = beforeDecimal * 10 + (number.charAt(i) - '0');
        }

       } else {
        afterDecimal = afterDecimal * 10 + number.charAt(i) - ('0');
        afterDecimalCount = afterDecimalCount * 10;
       }
      }
      if (afterDecimalCount != 0.0) {
       afterDecimal = afterDecimal / afterDecimalCount;
       result = beforeDecimal + afterDecimal;
      } else {
       result = beforeDecimal;
      }

      return result * signBit;
     }
    }



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