python gmail - How to send email via Django?





tutorial example (10)


For Django version 1.7, if above solutions dont work then try the following

in settings.py add

#For email
EMAIL_BACKEND = 'django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend'

EMAIL_USE_TLS = True

EMAIL_HOST = 'smtp.gmail.com'

EMAIL_HOST_USER = '[email protected]'

#Must generate specific password for your app in [gmail settings][1]
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'app_specific_password'

EMAIL_PORT = 587

#This did the trick
DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = EMAIL_HOST_USER

The last line did the trick for django 1.7

In my settings.py, I have the following:

EMAIL_BACKEND = 'django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend'

# Host for sending e-mail.
EMAIL_HOST = 'localhost'

# Port for sending e-mail.
EMAIL_PORT = 1025

# Optional SMTP authentication information for EMAIL_HOST.
EMAIL_HOST_USER = ''
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = ''
EMAIL_USE_TLS = False

My email code:

from django.core.mail import EmailMessage
email = EmailMessage('Hello', 'World', to=['[email protected]'])
email.send()

Of course, if I setup a debugging server via python -m smtpd -n -c DebuggingServer localhost:1025, I can see the email in my terminal.

However, how do I actually send the email not to the debugging server but to [email protected]?

After reading your answers, let me get something straight:

  1. Can't you use localhost(simple ubuntu pc) to send e-mails?

  2. I thought in django 1.3 send_mail() is somewhat deprecated and EmailMessage.send() is used instead?




My site is hosted on Godaddy and I have private email registered on the same. These are the settings which worked for me:

In settings.py:

EMAIL_HOST = 'mail.domain.com'
EMAIL_HOST_USER = '[email protected]'
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'abcdef'
DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = '[email protected]'
SERVER_EMAIL = '[email protected]'
EMAIL_PORT = 25
EMAIL_USE_TLS = False

In shell:

from django.core.mail import EmailMessage
email = EmailMessage('Subject', 'Body', to=['[email protected]'])
email.send()

Then I got "1" as the O/P i.e. Success. And I recieved the mail too. :)




  1. Create a project: django-admin.py startproject gmail
  2. Edit settings.py with code below:

    EMAIL_BACKEND = 'django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend'
    EMAIL_USE_TLS = True
    EMAIL_HOST = 'smtp.gmail.com'
    EMAIL_HOST_USER = '[email protected]'
    EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'email_password'
    EMAIL_PORT = 587
    
  3. Run interactive mode: python manage.py shell

  4. Import the EmailMessage module:

    from django.core.mail import EmailMessage
    
  5. Send the email:

    email = EmailMessage('Subject', 'Body', to=['[email protected]'])
    email.send()
    

For more informations, check send_mail and EmailMessage features in documents.

UPDATE for Gmail

Also if you have problems sending email via gmail remember to check this guides from google.

In your Google account settings, go to Security > Account permissions > Access for less secure apps and enable this option.

Also create an App specific password for your gmail after you've turned on 2-step-verification for it.

Then you should use app specific password in settings. So change the following line:

    EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'your_email_app_specific_password'



For SendGrid - Django Specifically:

SendGrid Django Docs here

Set these variables in

settings.py

EMAIL_HOST = 'smtp.sendgrid.net'
EMAIL_HOST_USER = 'sendgrid_username'
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'sendgrid_password'
EMAIL_PORT = 587
EMAIL_USE_TLS = True

in views.py

from django.core.mail import send_mail
send_mail('Subject here', 'Here is the message.', '[email protected]', ['[email protected]'], fail_silently=False)



I use Gmail as my SMTP server for Django. Much easier than dealing with postfix or whatever other server. I'm not in the business of managing email servers.

In settings.py:

EMAIL_USE_TLS = True
EMAIL_HOST = 'smtp.gmail.com'
EMAIL_PORT = 587
EMAIL_HOST_USER = '[email protected]'
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'password'

NOTE: In 2016 Gmail is not allowing this anymore by default. You can either use an external service like Sendgrid, or you can follow this tutorial from Google to reduce security but allow this option: https://support.google.com/accounts/answer/6010255




You could use "Test Mail Server Tool" to test email sending on your machine or localhost. Google and Download "Test Mail Server Tool" and set it up.

Then in your settings.py:

EMAIL_BACKEND= 'django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend'
EMAIL_HOST = 'localhost'
EMAIL_PORT = 25

From shell:

from django.core.mail import send_mail
send_mail('subject','message','sender email',['receipient email'],    fail_silently=False)



You need to use smtp as backend in settings.py

EMAIL_BACKEND = 'django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend'

If you use backend as console, you will receive output in console

EMAIL_BACKEND = 'django.core.mail.backends.console.EmailBackend'

And also below settings in addition

EMAIL_USE_TLS = True
EMAIL_HOST = 'smtp.gmail.com'
EMAIL_PORT = 587
EMAIL_HOST_USER = '[email protected]'
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = 'password'

If you are using gmail for this, setup 2-step verification and Application specific password and copy and paste that password in above EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD value.




Late, but:

In addition to the DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL fix others have mentioned, and allowing less-secure apps to access the account, I had to navigate to https://accounts.google.com/DisplayUnlockCaptcha while signed in as the account in question to get Django to finally authenticate.

I went to that URL through a SSH tunnel to the web server to make sure the IP address was the same; I'm not totally sure if that's necessary but it can't hurt. You can do that like so: ssh -D 8080 -fN <username>@<host>, then set your web browser to use localhost:8080 as a SOCKS proxy.




I found using SendGrid to be the easiest way to set up sending email with Django. Here's how it works:

  1. Create a SendGrid account (and verify your email)
  2. Add the following to your settings.py: EMAIL_HOST = 'smtp.sendgrid.net' EMAIL_HOST_USER = '<your sendgrid username>' EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = '<your sendgrid password>' EMAIL_PORT = 587 EMAIL_USE_TLS = True

And you're all set!

To send email:

from django.core.mail import send_mail
send_mail('<Your subject>', '<Your message>', '[email protected]', ['[email protected]'])

If you want Django to email you whenever there's a 500 internal server error, add the following to your settings.py:

DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = '[email protected]'
ADMINS = [('<Your name>', '[email protected]')]

Sending email with SendGrid is free up to 12k emails per month.




Do this:

[a-zA-Z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-zA-Z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]*[a-zA-Z0-9])?\.)+[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]*[a-zA-Z0-9])?

Why? It's based on RFC 2822, which is a standard ALL email addresses MUST adhere to.

Often when storing email addresses in the database I make them lowercase and, in practice, regexs can usually be marked case insensitive. In those cases this is slightly shorter:

[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?

Here's an example of it being used in JavaScript (with the case insensitive flag i at the end).

var emailCheck=/^[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?$/i;
console.log( emailCheck.test('[email protected]') );

Note:
Technically some emails can include quotes in the section before the @ symbol with escape characters inside the quotes (so your email user can be obnoxious and contain stuff like @ and "..." as long as it's written in quotes). NOBODY DOES THIS EVER! It's obsolete. But, it IS included in the true RFC 2822 standard, and omitted here.

More info: http://www.regular-expressions.info/email.html





python django email smtp