javascript - with - require js file




Does it make sense to use Require.js with Angular.js? (10)

Answer from Brian Ford

AngularJS has it's own module system an typically doesn't need something like RJS.

Reference: https://github.com/yeoman/generator-angular/issues/40

I'm a newbie to Angular.js and trying to understand how it's different from Backbone.js... We used to manage our packages dependencies with Require.js while using Backbone. Does it make sense to do the same with Angular.js?


As @ganaraj mentioned AngularJS has dependency injection at its core. When building toy seed applications with and without RequireJS, I personally found RequireJS was probably overkill for most use cases.

That doesn't mean RequireJS is not useful for it's script loading capabilities and keeping your codebase clean during development. Combining the r.js optimizer (https://github.com/jrburke/r.js) with almond (https://github.com/jrburke/almond) can create a very slim script loading story. However since its dependency management features are not as important with angular at the core of your application, you can also evaluate other client side (HeadJS, LABjs, ...) or even server side (MVC4 Bundler, ...) script loading solutions for your particular application.


I think that it depends on your project complexity since angular is pretty much modularized. Your controllers can be mapped and you can just import those JavaScript classes in your index.html page.

But in case your project get bigger. Or you anticipates such scenario, you should integrate angular with requirejs. In this article you can see a demo app for such integration.


I would avoid using Require.js. Apps I've seen that do this wind up a mess of multiple types of module pattern architecture. AMD, Revealing, different flavors of IIFE, etc. There are other ways to load on demand like the loadOnDemand Angular mod. Adding other stuff just fills your code full of cruft and creates a low signal to noise ratio and makes your code hard to read.



This I believe is a subjective question, so I will provide my subjective opinion.

Angular has a modularization mechanism built in. When you create your app, the first thing you would do is

var app = angular.module("myApp");

and then

app.directive(...);

app.controller(...);

app.service(...);

If you have a look at the angular-seed which is neat starter app for angular, they have separated out the directives, services, controllers etc into different modules and then loaded those modules as dependancies on your main app.

Something like :

var app = angular.module("myApp",["Directives","Controllers","Services"];

Angular also lazy loads these modules ( into memory) not their script files.

In terms of lazy loading script files, to be frank unless you are writing something extremely large it would be an overkill because angular by its very nature reduces the amount of code you write. A typical app written in most other frameworks could expect a reduction in around 30-50% in LOC if written in angular.


Using RequireJS with AngularJS makes sense but only if you understand how each of them works regarding dependency injection, as although both of them injects dependencies, they inject very different things.

AngularJS has its own dependency system that let you inject AngularJS modules to a newly created module in order to reuse implementations. Let's say you created a "first" module that implements an AngularJS filter "greet":

angular
  .module('first', [])
  .filter('greet', function() {
    return function(name) {
      return 'Hello, ' + name + '!';
    }
  });

And now let's say you want to use the "greet" filter in another module called "second" that implements a "goodbye" filter. You may do that injecting the "first" module to the "second" module:

angular
  .module('second', ['first'])
  .filter('goodbye', function() {
    return function(name) {
      return 'Good bye, ' + name + '!';
    }
  });

The thing is that in order to make this work correctly without RequireJS, you have to make sure that the "first" AngularJS module is loaded on the page before you create the "second" AngularJS module. Quoting documentation:

Depending on a module implies that required module needs to be loaded before the requiring module is loaded.

In that sense, here is where RequireJS can help you as RequireJS provides a clean way to inject scripts to the page helping you organize script dependencies between each other.

Going back to the "first" and "second" AngularJS modules, here is how you can do it using RequireJS separating the modules on different files to leverage script dependencies loading:

// firstModule.js file
define(['angular'], function(angular) {
  angular
    .module('first', [])
    .filter('greet', function() {
      return function(name) {
        return 'Hello, ' + name + '!';
      }
    });
});
// secondModule.js file
define(['angular', 'firstModule'], function(angular) {
  angular
    .module('second', ['first'])
    .filter('goodbye', function() {
      return function(name) {
        return 'Good bye, ' + name + '!';
      }
    });
});

You can see that we are depending on "firstModule" file to be injected before the content of the RequireJS callback can be executed which needs "first" AngularJS module to be loaded to create "second" AngularJS module.

Side note: Injecting "angular" on the "firstModule" and "secondModule" files as dependency is required in order to use AngularJS inside the RequireJS callback function and it have to be configured on RequireJS config to map "angular" to the library code. You may have AngularJS loaded to the page in a traditional manner too (script tag) although defeats RequireJS benefits.

More details on having RequireJS support from AngularJS core from 2.0 version on my blog post.

Based on my blog post "Making sense of RequireJS with AngularJS", here is the link.


Yes it makes sense to use angular.js along with require.js wherein you can use require.js for modularizing components.

I can point you to a seed project which uses both angular.js and require.js. Hope that helps!


Yes, it does, specially for very large SPA.

In some scenario, RequireJS is a must. For example, I develop PhoneGap applications using AngularJS that also uses Google Map API. Without AMD loader like RequireJS, the app would simply crash upon launch when offline as it cannot source the Google Map API scripts. An AMD loader gives me a chance to display an error message to the user.

However, integration between AngularJS and RequireJS is a bit tricky. I created angularAMD to make this a less painful process:

http://marcoslin.github.io/angularAMD/


Yes, it makes sense.

Angular modules don't try to solve the problem of script load ordering or lazy script fetching. These goals are orthogonal and both module systems can live side by side and fulfil their goals.

Source: Angular JS official website





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